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Raster Iteration in Model Builder - Allowing a user to select the raster inputs

Raster Iteration in Model Builder - Allowing a user to select the raster inputs


I have a basic model that uses Raster Iteration to process all of the rasters in a .gdb. The model allows the user to define a weighting in the GUI and then the model runs a raster calculation on each iteration, stores the results in Collect Values and finally does a Cell Statistics calculation ton create the final output.

As of now the Raster Iteration runs through all rasters in the .gdb. Is there a way of providing the user with a checkbox/radio button in the GUI to just choose a selection of the rasters in the .gdb?

The image below shows the model and the GUI. Ideally I'd like to be able to select the required rasters in the GUI before assigning the weightings.


Insert > Variable, and choose Raster Catalog. Create a set of raster catalogs in a geodatabase by right clicking on the GDB and selecting New -> Raster Catalog, and then right clicking on the newly created catalog and clicking Load -> Load Raster Datasets for your premade sets of raster groupings. Then right click on the variable and check the Model Parameter option.

Some other goodies you can do to modify your tool in ModelBuilder can be found here


Arndt Dibi

Many organizations often need to tackle several major changes to the IT that underpins their business simultaneously. This type of project is hard to deliver.

IT projects, like any other type of project, have a budget, delivery dates and requirements. What makes IT projects so unusual when compared to construction or engineering projects is that the scope and requirements change during the project. There is, to be sure, usually a small allowance in the budget for changes to the requirements, but the delivery time, typically nine months or less in an IT transformation, doesn’t change along with the changing requirements because this timeline must be met for the program objectives to stay relevant.

A large IT project will generally present some of the following challenges.

  1. The requirements will be complex.
  2. There will be a large number of requirements.
  3. The End-to-end requirements will affect many systems and have a high interdependency
  4. Many systems will be involved, sometimes requiring different skillsets.
  5. There will be significant changes in many systems at the same time.
  6. Some of the project resources are likely to belong to different companies and different cultures, and in different geographic locations.
  7. With project size, the task of managing Integration Testing and end-to-end testing will increase exponentially.

All these challenges can be managed individually, but when they come together in one project then project design and execution becomes highly complex. It takes specialist skills and tremendous effort from all involved to keep such a project on track.


Growth Engineering at Netflix — Automated Imagery Generation

Growth Engineering at Netflix — Automated Imagery Generation

Background

There’s a good chance you’ve probably visited the Netflix homepage. In the Growth Engineering team, we refer to this as the top of the signup funnel. For more background on the signup funnel and Growth Engineering’s role in the signup funnel, please read our initial post on the topic: Growth Engineering at Netflix — Accelerating Innovation. The primary focus of this post will be the top of the signup funnel. In particular, the Netflix homepage:

As discussed in our previous post, Growth Engineering owns the business logic and protocols that allow our UI partners to build lightweight and flexible applications for almost any platform. In some cases, like the homepage, this even involves providing appropriate imagery (e.g., the background image shown above). In this post, we’ll take a deep dive into the journey of content-based imagery on the Netflix homepage.

Motivation

At Netflix we do one thing — entertainment — and we aim to do it really well. We live and breathe TV shows and films, and we want everyone to be able to enjoy them too. That’s why we aspire to have best in class stories, across genres and believe people should have access to new voices, cultures and perspectives. The member-focused teams at Netflix are responsible for making sure the member experience is relevant and personalized, ensuring that this content is shown to the right people at the right time. But what about non-members those who are simply interested in signing up for Netflix, how should we highlight our content and convey our value propositions to them?

The Solution

The main mechanism for highlighting our content in the signup flow is through content-based imagery. Before designing a solution it’s important to understand the main product requirements for such a feature:

  • The content needs to be new, relevant, and regional (not all countries have the same catalogue).
  • The artwork needs to appeal to a broader audience. The non-member homepage serves a very broad audience and is not personalized to the extent of the member experience.
  • The imagery needs to be localized.
  • We need to be able to easily determine what imagery is present for a given platform, region, and language.
  • The homepage needs to load in a reasonable amount of time, even in poor network conditions.

Unpacking Product Requirements

Given the scale we require and the product requirements listed above, there are a number of technical requirements:

  • A list of titles for the asset, in some order.
  • Ensure the titles are appropriate for a broad audience, which means all titles need to be tagged with metadata.
  • Localized images for each of the titles.
  • Different assets for different device types and screen sizes.
  • Server-generated assets, since client-side generation would require the retrieval of many individual images, which would increase latency and time-to-render.
  • To reduce latency, assets should be generated in an offline fashion and not in real time.
  • The assets need to be compressed, without reducing quality significantly.
  • The assets will need to be stored somewhere and we’ll need to generate URLs for each of them.
  • We’ll need to figure out how to provide the correct asset URL for a given request.
  • We’ll need to build a search index so that the assets can be searchable.

Given this set of requirements, we can effectively break this work down into 3 functional buckets:

The Design

For our design, we decided to build 3 separate microservices, mapping to the aforementioned functional buckets. Let’s take a look at each of these services in turn.

Asset Generation

The Asset Generation Service is responsible for generating groups of assets. We call these groups of assets, asset groups. Each request will generate a single asset group that will contain one or more assets. To support the demands of our stakeholders we designed a Domain Specific Language (DSL) that we call an asset generation recipe. An asset generation request contains a recipe. Below is an example of a simple recipe:

This recipe can then be issued via an HTTP POST request to the Asset Generation Service. The recipe can then be translated into ImageMagick commands that can do the heavy lifting. At a high level, the following diagram captures the necessary steps required to build an asset.

Generating a single localized asset is a big achievement, but we still need to store the asset somewhere and have the ability to search for it. This requires an asset storage solution.

Asset Storage

We refer to asset storage and management simply as asset management. We felt it would be beneficial to create a separate microservice for asset management for 2 reasons. First, asset generation is CPU intensive and bursty. We can leverage high performance VMs in AWS to generate the assets. We can scale up when generation is occurring and scale down when there is no batch in the queue. However, it would be cost-inefficient to leverage this same hardware for lightweight and more consistent traffic patterns that an asset management service requires.

Let’s take a look at the internals of the Asset Management Service.

At this point we’ve laid out all the details in order to generate a content-based asset and have it stored as part of an asset group, which is persisted and indexed. The next thing to consider is, how do we retrieve an asset in real time and surface it on the Netflix homepage?

If you recall in our previous blog post, Growth Engineering owns a service called the Orchestration Service. It is a mid-tier service that emits a custom JSON data structure that contains fields that are consumed by the UI. The UI can then use these fields to control the presentation in the UI layer. There are two approaches for adding fields to the Orchestration Service’s response. First, the fields can be coded by hand. Second, fields can be added via configuration via a service we call the Customization Service. Since assets will need to be periodically refreshed and we want this process to be entirely automated, it makes sense to pursue the configuration-based approach. To accomplish this, the Asset Management Service needs to translate an asset group into a rule definition for the Customization Service.

Customization Service

Let’s review the Orchestration Service and introduce the Customization Service. The Orchestration Service emits fields in response to upstream requests. For the homepage, there are typically only a small number of fields provided by the Orchestration Service. The following fields are supplied by application code. For example:

The Orchestration Service also supports fields supplied by configuration. We call these adaptive fields. Adaptive fields are provided by the Customization Service. The Customization Service is a rules engine that emits the adaptive fields. For example, a rule to provide the background image for the homepage in the en-US locale would look as follows:

The corresponding payload for such a rule might look as follows:

Bringing this all together, the response from the Orchestration Service would now look as follows:

At this point, we are now able to generate an asset, persist it, search it, and generate customization rules for it. The generated rules then enable us to return a particular asset for a particular request. Let’s put it all together and review the system interaction diagram.

We now have all the pieces in place to automatically generate artwork and have that artwork appear on the Netflix homepage for a given request. At least one open question remains, how can we scale asset generation?

Scaling Asset Generation

Arguably, there are a number of approaches that could be used to scale asset generation. We decided to opt for an all-or-nothing approach. Meaning, all assets for a given recipe need to be generated as a single asset group. This enables smooth rollback in case of any errors. Additionally, asset generation is CPU intensive and each recipe can produce 1000s of assets as a result of the number of platform, region, and language permutations. Even with high performance VMs, generating 1000s of assets can take a long time. As a result, we needed to find a way to distribute asset generation across multiple VMs. Here’s what the final architecture looked like.

Briefly, let’s review the steps:

  1. The batch process is initiated by a cron job. The job executes a script that contains an asset generation recipe.
  2. The Asset Generation Service receives the request and creates asset generation tasks that can be distributed across any number of Asset Generation Worker nodes. One of the nodes is elected as the leader via Zookeeper. Its job is to coordinate asset generation across the other workers and ensure all assets get generated.
  3. Once the primary worker node has all the assets, it creates an asset group in the Asset Management Service. The Asset Management Service persists, indexes, and uploads the assets to the CDN.
  4. Finally, the Asset Management Service creates rules from the asset group and pushes the rules to the Customization Service. Once the data is published in the Customization Service, the Orchestration Service can supply the correct URLs in its JSON response by invoking the Customization Service with a request context that matches a given set of rules.

Conclusion

Automated asset generation has proven to be an extremely valuable investment. It is low-maintenance, high-leverage, and has allowed us to experiment with a variety of different types of assets on different platforms and on different parts of the product. This project was technically challenging and highly rewarding, both to the engineers involved in the project, and to the business. The Netflix homepage has come a long way over the last several years.

We’re hiring! Join Growth Engineering and help us build the future of Netflix.

Growth Engineering at Netflix — Automated Imagery Generation was originally published in Netflix TechBlog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


Markov Decision processes

P – Given a state s1 and action a, what is the probability of ending up at a particular state s2? This information is provided by P. This is called a State transition probability matrix. S*A*S

R – What is the reward for taking an action a at the state s?

Pi – Policy, what action to take at which state? A mapping from state space to action space. The optimal policy is the policy with the maximum reward.

Value function – Expected reward starting from state s and following policy pi.

Ways to find an optimal policy:

Optimal policy when starting in state s is the policy whose value function is maximum starting from state s.

Think about the case where a particular policy is always better than another policy for all initial states. The first policy is greater than second policy and this is called partial ordering.

There always exists a policy such that the partial ordering of it with all other policies is greater or equal. Such a policy/policies is called optimal policy.

  1. Policy iteration:
    1. At each state, pick the action with max value function.
    2. you get the new policy.
    3. Again go to step 1 and loop until the new policy and old policy are same.
    1. Finding an optimal value function rather than explicit policy.
    2. For every iteration improve value vector.
    3. once you converge to a particular value vector, use it to find the optimal policy.
    4. This is cheap compared to policy iteration.

    Model-free methods:

    Reinforcement learning is Markov decision process with unknown transition model and/or reward distribution.

    Agent can observe samples and induce transition model and reward distribution from that.

    Uses Q-values instead of the value function.

    Utility: Utility of the policy at a state is what happens if we start running from that state.

    Reward gives us immediate feedback but utility gives us long-term feedback. utilities allow you to take short-term negatives for long-term positives.

    Credit assignment problem:


    2 Related work

    A straightforward way to simulate graphs is to generate them using well-established network models [25] : (1) Barabási-Albert model for the scale-free network [26] , (2) Watts-Strogatz small-world model for the small-world network [27] , (3) Erdős-Rényi model for the random graph network [28, 29, 30, 31] , (4) Forest-fire Model model [32, 33] .

    Random-graph Model: In the random graph network model, one creates a network with some properties of interest (specific degree distribution) and otherwise random. Although random graph model was first studied by Solomonoff and Rapoport [28] this model is mainly associated with Paul Erdős and Alfréd Rényi [29, 31] .

    Scale-free Model: The scale-free model shows power law node degree distribution P ( k ) ∼ k − α (where k is the node degree and typically 2 < α < 3 ) for a social network. This kind of distribution was first discussed by Price [34] . Price, in turn, was inspired by Herbert Simon, who discusses power law in a variety of non-network economic data [35] .

    Small-world Model: Transitivity measured by the network clustering coefficient despite being extensively studied, is still one of the least understood properties in network analysis according to Newman [36] . Another important property we observe in real networks is the small-world effect – all nodes are connected with each other by relatively short paths. To model these two properties Watts and Strogatz introduced a small-world network model [27] .

    Forest-fire Model: In this model the new node, i , connects to another existing node j , and then again makes a connection with the adjacent node j 1 of the newly connected node j 0 . The node i

    then carries on making connections with a probability

    p based on adjacent nodes [32, 33] . For example, in citation networks, an author finds a paper and cites it. He or she then cites more papers through that paper recursively [32] . In a social network, a friend j may introduce someone i with his/her mutual friend and then the friend circle grows for the person i [32] . The model is named as forest fire because it imitates self-organising behaviour of a forest fire [33] .

    These quintessential network models are one of the most important contribution towards understanding and modelling complex networks. However, these mathematical models are solely driven by the topology of a network. For example, the Scale-free model considers the degree of a node and the Small-world model considers mutual friends. Neither features nor labels of nodes and/or connections are mimicked by those models. However, one can generate synthetic social networks with features is to find similarities/correlations between randomly assigned n number of features and let those similarities define connections [37, 38, 39]

    . For obvious reasons, this naïve approach is not ideal due to several limitations. Firstly, correlations between feature vectors do not consider the network topology. Secondly, a common correlation metric would assume every person in a social network views and prefers a potential friend’s features equally in a linear fashion. Finally, it is often not obvious what the node labels are, which is an issue we discuss in detail in Section

    However, there are some recent developments in agent and event-based social network modelling which are discussed below.

    Agent-based modelling: Bruch and Atwell [40] provide a guideline on the agent-based modelling of social networks. In the paper by Bruch and Atwell [40] , it is argued that the interplay between the micro and macro level characteristics is complex, and the macro level characteristics are not emergent solely from the simple aggregation of micro level characteristics or low level entities such as social network users [41] . Instead, micro and macro level behaviour or characteristics form a feedback loop, resulting in a nonlinear interaction. From a social network point of view, the graph level and node level characteristics could be thought of as macro and micro level characteristics of the network respectively.

    However, to simulate the modelling approach specific to social networks, one should consider the well-studied graph properties such as preferential attachment, mutual friend preferences etc., and provide instructions on how to account for these properties in the simulation. In the research article of Granovetter [41] , these social network properties are considered, but implicitly included in terms of the macro and micro level characteristics. In summary, this study by Granovetter [41] provides a generic guideline to model social networks but a detailed and specific mathematical modelling instruction and analysis of the social network properties are not discussed.

    In another work by Kavak et al. [42] , the authors have argued that modelling should be performed by explicitly using available real-world dataset. In their experiment, they have simulated human mobility model based on 826,021,868 twitter messages. Furthermore, they have uncovered the Geolocation of 92,296 users for the purpose of modelling. However, the purpose of our simulation is to produce synthetic good quality graph structured datasets when real-world data is not available, which is increasingly the case as discussed in Section 1 .

    Event based modelling: One recent interesting development in modelling dynamic event-based graph is the Cognition-driven Social Network (CogSNet) model [43] . The CogSNet models social network-based on the human memory model. Authors argue that, similar to the human memory, a social event is strengthened by repeated exposure to a similar event and weakens by deprivation of that event. Although CogSNet proposes a new paradigm in social network modelling, it does not provide an explicit explanation modelling features within the dynamic event based graph. Providing open source social network datasets with labels, features, and graph or topological characteristics is the primary goal of this study.

    To address the issues discussed above, i.e., 1) lack of guidelines on implementing both the well-studied network properties in social networks and features, 2) insufficient research on simulating dynamic social networks with node features, 3) lack of rigorous study providing directions on defining node labels in social networks, we propose a framework for social graph simulation. In our model, the simulated networks have the following characteristics based on understanding of Facebook-type social networks, along with well-studied social network properties such as preferential attachment.

    Node features are evaluated by other nodes before connecting. If two nodes are forming a connection, the decision of forming a link is taken by both of the nodes, thus both parties should evaluate each other’s features.

    The decision of forming a connection is based on the preferences of nodes, which are consist of a set of latent variables. These preferences are not directly linked with users’ features. For example, two people could live in any state or county, but the preference towards a particular political party could be same, thus resulting in different features but common preferences.

    People have common preferences. For example, a group of people in social network may prefer a common ideology or political view.

    The node and graph level characteristics should both be taken into account while modelling a network. Node level characteristics consist of features (i.e. node attributes such as age, gender, etc.), individual preferences (latent variables such as preference towards a particular type of people, discussed in more detail in the Section 3 ), node degree (i.e. preferential attachment). Whereas, graph level characteristics is e.g. smaller path length preference, i.e. connecting with friends who are nearer in terms of the graph topology.


    New Knowledge in Information Systems and Technologies: Volume 1 [1st ed.] 978-3-030-16180-4978-3-030-16181-1

    Table of contents :
    Front Matter . Pages i-xxviii
    Front Matter . Pages 1-1
    My Employer’s Prestige, My Prestige (Tom Sander, Phoey Lee Teh). Pages 3-11
    The Four Major Factors Impacting on the Future of Work (Michal Beno). Pages 12-24
    The Future of the Digital Workforce: Current and Future Challenges for Executive and Administrative Assistants (Anabela Mesquita, Luciana Oliveira, Arminda Sequeira). Pages 25-38
    Project Management Practices at Portuguese Startups (Anabela Tereso, Celina P. Leão, Tobias Ribeiro). Pages 39-49
    The Application of Clustering Techniques to Group Archaeological Artifacts (N. Mikhailova, E. Mikhailova, N. Grafeeva). Pages 50-57
    Segmentation of Magnetic Anomalies in the Conduct of Archaeological Excavations (Sofya Ilinykh, Natalia Grafeeva, Elena Mikhailova, Olga Egorova). Pages 58-67
    Automatic Document Annotation with Data Mining Algorithms (Alda Canito, Goreti Marreiros, Juan Manuel Corchado). Pages 68-76
    Generation Z and the Technology Use During a Trip (Pedro Liberato, Cátia Aires, Dália Liberato, Álvaro Rocha). Pages 77-90
    Information and Communication Technologies in Creative and Sustainable Tourism (Ana Ferreira, Pedro Liberato, Dália Liberato, Álvaro Rocha). Pages 91-100
    The Importance of Project Management Competences: A Case Study in Public Administration (Eliane Gonzales Meirelles, Anabela Tereso, Cláudio Santos). Pages 101-111
    Improvement of Industrialization Projects Management: An Automotive Industry Case Study (Diana Fernandes, Anabela Tereso, Gabriela Fernandes). Pages 112-121
    A Digital Strategy for SMEs in the Retail Business that Allows the Increase of Sales (Alesandro Anthony Huayllas Iriarte, Betsy Andrea Reinaltt Higa, Alfredo Barrientos Padilla, Rosario Villalta Riega). Pages 122-131
    Multi-split HDFS Technique for Improving Data Confidentiality in Big Data Replication (Mostafa R. Kaseb, Mohamed H. Khafagy, Ihab A. Ali, ElSayed M. Saad). Pages 132-142
    Social Media, Evolutionary Psychology, and ISIS: A Literature Review and Future Research Directions (Sylvie Borau, Samuel Fosso Wamba). Pages 143-154
    Improvement of the Applicability of the General Data Protection Regulation in Health Clinics (Isabel Maria Lopes, Teresa Guarda, Pedro Oliveira). Pages 155-165
    The Use of LinkedIn for ICT Recruitment (Guilherme Pinho, João Arantes, Tiago Marques, Frederico Branco, Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira). Pages 166-175
    The Role of Technologies: Creating a New Labour Market (Ana Isabel Vieira, Eva Oliveira, Francisca Silva, Marco Oliveira, Ramiro Gonçalves, Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira). Pages 176-184
    Hybrid Machine Translation Oriented to Cross-Language Information Retrieval: English-Spanish Error Analysis (Juncal Gutiérrez-Artacho, María-Dolores Olvera-Lobo, Irene Rivera-Trigueros). Pages 185-194
    Fake News and Social Networks: How Users Interact with Fake Content (Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira, Carlota P. A. Carlos, Hugo Pintor, João Caires, Julia Zanoni). Pages 195-205
    What Will the Future Bring? The Impact of Automation on Skills and (Un)employment (Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira, Ana Carina Almeida, Ana Rita Arromba, Cátia Fernandes, Inês Cardoso). Pages 206-217
    Ambient Assisted Living – A Bibliometric Analysis (João Viana, André Ramalho, José Valente, Alberto Freitas). Pages 218-228
    A Taboo-Search Algorithm for 3D-Binpacking Problem in Containers (Paul Leon, Rony Cueva, Manuel Tupia, Gonçalo Paiva Dias). Pages 229-240
    Artificial Intelligence in Government Services: A Systematic Literature Review (João Reis, Paula Espírito Santo, Nuno Melão). Pages 241-252
    Ontology Driven Feedforward Risk Management (Cédric Gaspoz, Ulysse Rosselet, Mathias Rossi, Mélanie Thomet). Pages 253-261
    Incremental Hotel Recommendation with Inter-guest Trust and Similarity Post-filtering (Fátima Leal, Benedita Malheiro, Juan Carlos Burguillo). Pages 262-272
    Traffic Flow Forecasting on Data-Scarce Environments Using ARIMA and LSTM Networks (Bruno Fernandes, Fábio Silva, Hector Alaiz-Moretón, Paulo Novais, Cesar Analide, José Neves). Pages 273-282
    Mapping Clinical Practice Guidelines to SWRL Rules (Samia Sbissi, Mariem Mahfoudh, Said Gattoufi). Pages 283-292
    Towards the Automatic Construction of an Intelligent Tutoring System: Domain Module (Alan Ramírez-Noriega, Yobani Martínez-Ramírez, José Emilio Sánchez García, Erasmo Miranda Bojórquez, J. Francisco Figueroa Pérez, José Mendivil-Torres et al.). Pages 293-302
    Deep Learning and Sub-Word-Unit Approach in Written Art Generation (Krzysztof Wołk, Emilia Zawadzka-Gosk, Wojciech Czarnowski). Pages 303-315
    Toward a Knowledge Sharing-Aimed Virtual Enterprise (Nastaran Hajiheydari, Mojtaba Talafidaryani, SeyedHossein Khabiri). Pages 316-325
    Towards the Digital Transformation: Are Portuguese Organizations in This Way? (Carla Santos Pereira, Fernando Moreira, Natércia Durão, Maria João Ferreira). Pages 326-336
    Validation and Evaluation of the Mapping Process for Generating Ontologies from Relational Databases (Bilal Benmahria, Ilham Chaker, Azeddine Zahi). Pages 337-350
    ERP Conceptual Ecology (Fernando Bento, Carlos J. Costa, Manuela Aparicio). Pages 351-360
    Data Quality Mining (Alexandra Oliveira, Rita Gaio, Pilar Baylina, Carlos Rebelo, Luís Paulo Reis). Pages 361-372
    Contextualising the National Cyber Security Capacity in an Unstable Environment: A Spring Land Case Study (Mohamed Altaher Ben Naseir, Huseyin Dogan, Edward Apeh, Christopher Richardson, Raian Ali). Pages 373-382
    EU General Data Protection Regulation Implementation: An Institutional Theory View (Isabel Maria Lopes, Teresa Guarda, Pedro Oliveira). Pages 383-393
    Design of a Situation-Awareness Solution to Support Infrastructure Inspections (Carme Vidal Quintáns, Gabriel Pestana). Pages 394-404
    A Systematic Literature Review in Blockchain: Benefits and Implications of the Technology for Business (João Pedro Marques Ferreira, Maria José Angélico Gonçalves, Amélia Ferreira da Silva). Pages 405-414
    SPAINChain: Security, Privacy, and Ambient Intelligence in Negotiation Between IOT and Blockchain (Mohamed A. El-dosuky, Gamal H. Eladl). Pages 415-425
    Ontology Supporting Model-Based Systems Engineering Based on a GOPPRR Approach (Hongwei Wang, Guoxin Wang, Jinzhi Lu, Changfeng Ma). Pages 426-436
    A Multi-agent System Framework for Dialogue Games in the Group Decision-Making Context (João Carneiro, Patrícia Alves, Goreti Marreiros, Paulo Novais). Pages 437-447
    Employee Performance Evaluation Within the Economic Management System of the Spanish Air Force: Development of a Methodology and an Optimization Model (Manuel A. Fernández-Villacañas Marín). Pages 448-455
    Improving Control Effectiveness in IS Development Projects Through Participatory Implementation (Roman Walser). Pages 456-459
    DSL Based Automatic Generation of Q&A Systems (Renato Preigschadt de Azevedo, Maria João Varanda Pereira, Pedro Rangel Henriques). Pages 460-471
    On Semantic Search Algorithm Optimization (Alexander Gusenkov, Naille Bukharaev). Pages 472-481
    Predict the Personality of Facebook Profiles Using Automatic Learning Techniques and BFI Test (Graciela Guerrero, Elvis Sarchi, Freddy Tapia). Pages 482-493
    A Review on Relations Extraction in Police Reports (Gonçalo Carnaz, Paulo Quaresma, Vitor Beires Nogueira, Mário Antunes, Nuno N. M. Fonseca Ferreira). Pages 494-503
    Towards a Personalised Recommender Platform for Sportswomen (Juan M. Santos-Gago, Luis Álvarez-Sabucedo, Roberto González-Maciel, Víctor M. Alonso-Rorís, José L. García-Soidán, Carmina Wanden-Berghe et al.). Pages 504-514
    Trusted Data’s Marketplace (António Brandão, Henrique São Mamede, Ramiro Gonçalves). Pages 515-527
    A NoSQL Solution for Bioinformatics Data Provenance Storage (Ingrid Santana, Waldeyr Mendes C. da Silva, Maristela Holanda). Pages 528-537
    DOORchain: Deep Ontology-Based Operation Research to Detect Malicious Smart Contracts (Mohamed A. El-Dosuky, Gamal H. Eladl). Pages 538-545
    A Smart Cache Strategy for Tag-Based Browsing of Digital Collections (Joaquín Gayoso-Cabada, Mercedes Gómez-Albarrán, José-Luis Sierra). Pages 546-555
    Identifying Most Probable Negotiation Scenario in Bilateral Contracts with Reinforcement Learning (Francisco Silva, Tiago Pinto, Isabel Praça, Zita Vale). Pages 556-571
    Front Matter . Pages 573-573
    Using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in SAP Fiori (Daniela Beselga, Bráulio Alturas). Pages 575-584
    Evaluation of Local E-government Maturity in the Lima Metropolitan Area (Gonçalo Paiva Dias, Manuel Tupia, José Manuel Magallanes Reyes). Pages 585-594
    An Approach to GDPR Based on Object Role Modeling (António Gonçalves, Anacleto Correia, Luís Cavique). Pages 595-602
    A Study over NoSQL Performance (Pedro Martins, Maryam Abbasi, Filipe Sá). Pages 603-611
    A New Model for Evaluation of Human Resources: Case Study of Catering Industry (João Paulo Pereira, Natalya Efanova, Ivan Slesarenko). Pages 612-621
    A Governing Framework for Data-Driven Small Organizations in Colombia (Diana Heredia-Vizcaíno, Wilson Nieto). Pages 622-629
    Critical Success Factors for Corporate Data Quality Management (Ana Lucas). Pages 630-644
    Solutions for Data Quality in GIS and VGI: A Systematic Literature Review (Gabriel Medeiros, Maristela Holanda). Pages 645-654
    Use of the Lean Methodology to Reduce Truck Repair Time: A Case Study (Alexander Börger, Javiera Alfaro, Priscila León). Pages 655-665
    Proposal to Avoid Issues in the DevOps Implementation: A Systematic Literature Review (Mirna Muñoz, Mario Negrete, Jezreel Mejía). Pages 666-677
    Role of Green HRM Practices in Employees’ Pro-environmental IT Practices (Adedapo Oluwaseyi Ojo, Murali Raman). Pages 678-688
    Innovation Trends for Smart Factories: A Literature Review (Maria José Sousa, Rui Cruz, Álvaro Rocha, Miguel Sousa). Pages 689-698
    Open Government Data in Kingdom of Bahrain: Towards an Effective Implementation Framework (Abdull-Kareem Katbi, Jaflah Al-Ammary). Pages 699-715
    Modelling Reporting Delays in a Multilevel Structured Surveillance System - Application to Portuguese HIV-AIDS Data (Alexandra Oliveira, Humberta Amorim, Rita Gaio, Luís Paulo Reis). Pages 716-726
    Study of a Successful ERP Implementation Using an Extended Information Systems Success Model in Cameroon Universities: Case of CUCA (Chris Emmanuel Tchatchouang Wanko, Jean Robert Kala Kamdjoug, Samuel Fosso Wamba). Pages 727-737
    Conceptual Approach for an Extension to a Mushroom Farm Distributed Process Control System: IoT and Blockchain (Frederico Branco, Fernando Moreira, José Martins, Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira, Ramiro Gonçalves). Pages 738-747
    Improving Automatic BPMN Layouting by Experimentally Evaluating User Preferences (Tobias Scholz, Daniel Lübke). Pages 748-757
    Drone Based DSM Reconstruction for Flood Simulations in Small Areas: A Pilot Study (P. Rinaldi, I. Larrabide, J. P. D’Amato). Pages 758-764
    Web Application for Management of Scientific Conferences (João Bioco, Alvaro Rocha). Pages 765-774
    Localizing Inconsistencies into Software Process Models at a Conceptual Level (Noureddine Kerzazi). Pages 775-788
    Front Matter . Pages 789-789
    On the Practicality of Subspace Tracking in Information Systems (Noor Ahmed, Gregory Hasseler). Pages 791-800
    A Model-Driven Approach for the Integration of Hardware Nodes in the IoT (Darwin Alulema, Javier Criado, Luis Iribarne). Pages 801-811
    Multiphase CFD Simulation of Photogrammetry 3D Model for UAV Crop Spraying (Héctor Guillermo Parra, Victor Daniel Angulo Morales, Elvis Eduardo Gaona Garcia). Pages 812-822
    Towards a Taxonomy of Software Maintainability Predictors (Sara Elmidaoui, Laila Cheikhi, Ali Idri). Pages 823-832
    A BPMN Extension for Business Process Outsourcing to the Cloud (Karim Zarour, Djamel Benmerzoug, Nawal Guermouche, Khalil Drira). Pages 833-843
    A Computational Modeling Based on Trigonometric Cubic B-Spline Functions for the Approximate Solution of a Second Order Partial Integro-Differential Equation (Arshed Ali, Kamil Khan, Fazal Haq, Syed Inayat Ali Shah). Pages 844-854
    Addressing Fine-Grained Variability in User-Centered Software Product Lines: A Case Study on Dashboards (Andrea Vázquez-Ingelmo, Francisco J. García-Peñalvo, Roberto Therón). Pages 855-864
    Estimate of Discharge of Lithium-Ion Batteries (Erick Frota da Costa, Darielson Araújo de Souza, Miquéias Silva Araújo, Vandilberto Pereira Pinto, Artur Melo Peixoto, Erivaldo Pinheiro da Costa Júnior). Pages 865-874
    Study of the Number Recognition Algorithms Efficiency After a Reduction of the Characteristic Space Using Typical Testors (Kuntur Muenala, Julio Ibarra-Fiallo, Monserrate Intriago-Pazmiño). Pages 875-885
    Patterns of Ambiguity in Textual Requirements Specification (David Šenkýř, Petr Kroha). Pages 886-895
    3D Simulator Based on SimTwo to Evaluate Algorithms in Micromouse Competition (Lucas Eckert, Luis Piardi, José Lima, Paulo Costa, Antonio Valente, Alberto Nakano). Pages 896-903
    Towards Forest Fire Prevention and Combat Through Citizen Science (João Bioco, Paulo Fazendeiro). Pages 904-915
    An Approach for Migrating Legacy Applications to Mobile Interfaces (Viviana Cajas, Matías Urbieta, Yves Rybarczyk, Gustavo Rossi, César Guevara). Pages 916-927
    Designing IoT Infrastructure for Neuromarketing Research (Tatjana Vasiljević, Zorica Bogdanović, Branka Rodić, Tamara Naumović, Aleksandra Labus). Pages 928-935
    Extraction of Fact Tables from a Relational Database: An Effort to Establish Rules in Denormalization (Luís Cavique, Mariana Cavique, António Gonçalves). Pages 936-945
    Deep Learning in State-of-the-Art Image Classification Exceeding 99% Accuracy (Emilia Zawadzka-Gosk, Krzysztof Wołk, Wojciech Czarnowski). Pages 946-957
    Absenteeism Prediction in Call Center Using Machine Learning Algorithms (Evandro Lopes de Oliveira, José M. Torres, Rui S. Moreira, Rafael Alexandre França de Lima). Pages 958-968
    Back Matter . Pages 969-972

    Citation preview

    Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing 930

    Álvaro Rocha Hojjat Adeli Luís Paulo Reis Sandra Costanzo Editors

    New Knowledge in Information Systems and Technologies Volume 1

    Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing Volume 930

    Series Editor Janusz Kacprzyk, Systems Research Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland Advisory Editors Nikhil R. Pal, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata, India Rafael Bello Perez, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Computing, Universidad Central de Las Villas, Santa Clara, Cuba Emilio S. Corchado, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain Hani Hagras, Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, Colchester, UK László T. Kóczy, Department of Automation, Széchenyi István University, Gyor, Hungary Vladik Kreinovich, Department of Computer Science, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA Chin-Teng Lin, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan Jie Lu, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Patricia Melin, Graduate Program of Computer Science, Tijuana Institute of Technology, Tijuana, Mexico Nadia Nedjah, Department of Electronics Engineering, University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Ngoc Thanh Nguyen, Faculty of Computer Science and Management, Wrocław University of Technology, Wrocław, Poland Jun Wang, Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong

    The series “Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing” contains publications on theory, applications, and design methods of Intelligent Systems and Intelligent Computing. Virtually all disciplines such as engineering, natural sciences, computer and information science, ICT, economics, business, e-commerce, environment, healthcare, life science are covered. The list of topics spans all the areas of modern intelligent systems and computing such as: computational intelligence, soft computing including neural networks, fuzzy systems, evolutionary computing and the fusion of these paradigms, social intelligence, ambient intelligence, computational neuroscience, artificial life, virtual worlds and society, cognitive science and systems, Perception and Vision, DNA and immune based systems, self-organizing and adaptive systems, e-Learning and teaching, human-centered and human-centric computing, recommender systems, intelligent control, robotics and mechatronics including human-machine teaming, knowledge-based paradigms, learning paradigms, machine ethics, intelligent data analysis, knowledge management, intelligent agents, intelligent decision making and support, intelligent network security, trust management, interactive entertainment, Web intelligence and multimedia. The publications within “Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing” are primarily proceedings of important conferences, symposia and congresses. They cover significant recent developments in the field, both of a foundational and applicable character. An important characteristic feature of the series is the short publication time and world-wide distribution. This permits a rapid and broad dissemination of research results. ** Indexing: The books of this series are submitted to ISI Proceedings, EI-Compendex, DBLP, SCOPUS, Google Scholar and Springerlink **

    More information about this series at http://www.springer.com/series/11156

    Álvaro Rocha Hojjat Adeli Luís Paulo Reis Sandra Costanzo •

    New Knowledge in Information Systems and Technologies Volume 1

    Editors Álvaro Rocha Departamento de Engenharia Informática Universidade de Coimbra Coimbra, Portugal Luís Paulo Reis Faculdade de Engenharia/LIACC Universidade do Porto Porto, Portugal

    Hojjat Adeli The Ohio State University Columbus, OH, USA Sandra Costanzo DIMES Università della Calabria Arcavacata di Rende, Italy

    ISSN 2194-5357 ISSN 2194-5365 (electronic) Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing ISBN 978-3-030-16180-4 ISBN 978-3-030-16181-1 (eBook) https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-16181-1 Library of Congress Control Number: 2019934961 © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019 This work is subject to copyright. All rights are reserved by the Publisher, whether the whole or part of the material is concerned, specifically the rights of translation, reprinting, reuse of illustrations, recitation, broadcasting, reproduction on microfilms or in any other physical way, and transmission or information storage and retrieval, electronic adaptation, computer software, or by similar or dissimilar methodology now known or hereafter developed. The use of general descriptive names, registered names, trademarks, service marks, etc. in this publication does not imply, even in the absence of a specific statement, that such names are exempt from the relevant protective laws and regulations and therefore free for general use. The publisher, the authors and the editors are safe to assume that the advice and information in this book are believed to be true and accurate at the date of publication. Neither the publisher nor the authors or the editors give a warranty, expressed or implied, with respect to the material contained herein or for any errors or omissions that may have been made. The publisher remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. This Springer imprint is published by the registered company Springer Nature Switzerland AG The registered company address is: Gewerbestrasse 11, 6330 Cham, Switzerland

    This book contains a selection of papers accepted for presentation and discussion at The 2019 World Conference on Information Systems and Technologies (WorldCIST’19). This Conference had the support of IEEE SMC (IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society), AISTI (Iberian Association for Information Systems and Technologies/Associação Ibérica de Sistemas e Tecnologias de Informação), GIIM (Global Institute for IT Management), and University of Vigo. It took place at La Toja, Galicia, Spain, April 16–19, 2019. The World Conference on Information Systems and Technologies (WorldCIST) is a global forum for researchers and practitioners to present and discuss recent results and innovations, current trends, professional experiences and challenges of modern Information Systems and Technologies research, technological development and applications. One of its main aims is to strengthen the drive toward a holistic symbiosis between academy, society, and industry. WorldCIST’19 built on the successes of WorldCIST’13 held at Olhão, Algarve, Portugal WorldCIST’14 held at Funchal, Madeira, Portugal WorldCIST’15 held at São Miguel, Azores, Portugal WorldCIST’16 held at Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil WorldCIST’17 held at Porto Santo, Madeira, Portugal and WorldCIST’18 took place at Naples, Italy. The Program Committee of WorldCIST’19 was composed of a multidisciplinary group of more than 200 experts and those who are intimately concerned with Information Systems and Technologies. They have had the responsibility for evaluating, in a ‘blind review’ process, the papers received for each of the main themes proposed for the Conference: (A) Information and Knowledge Management (B) Organizational Models and Information Systems (C) Software and Systems Modeling (D) Software Systems, Architectures, Applications and Tools (E) Multimedia Systems and Applications (F) Computer Networks, Mobility and Pervasive Systems (G) Intelligent and Decision Support Systems (H) Big Data Analytics and Applications (I) Human–Computer Interaction (J) Ethics, Computers and Security (K) Health Informatics (L) Information Technologies in Education (M) Information Technologies in Radiocommunications and (N) Technologies for Biomedical Applications.

    The Conference also included workshop sessions taking place in parallel with the conference ones. Workshop sessions covered themes such as: (i) Air Quality and Open Data: Challenges for Data Science, HCI and AI (ii) Digital Transformation (iii) Empirical Studies in the Domain of Social Network Computing (iv) Health Technology Innovation: Emerging Trends and Future Challenges (v) Healthcare Information Systems Interoperability, Security and Efficiency (vi) New Pedagogical Approaches with Technologies (vii) Pervasive Information Systems. WorldCIST’19 received about 400 contributions from 61 countries around the world. The papers accepted for presentation and discussion at the Conference are published by Springer (this book) in three volumes and will be submitted for indexing by ISI, Ei Compendex, Scopus, DBLP, and/or Google Scholar, among others. Extended versions of selected best papers will be published in special or regular issues of relevant journals, mainly SCI/SSCI and Scopus/Ei Compendex indexed journals. We acknowledge all of those that contributed to the staging of WorldCIST’19 (authors, committees, workshop organizers, and sponsors). We deeply appreciate their involvement and support that was crucial for the success of WorldCIST’19. April 2019

    Álvaro Rocha Hojjat Adeli Luís Paulo Reis Sandra Costanzo

    Conference General Chair Álvaro Rocha

    University of Coimbra, Portugal

    Co-chairs Hojjat Adeli Luis Paulo Reis Sandra Costanzo

    The Ohio State University, USA University of Porto, Portugal University of Calabria, Italy

    Local Chair Manuel Pérez Cota

    Advisory Committee Ana Maria Correia (Chair) Andrew W. H. Ip Cihan Cobanoglu Chris Kimble Erik Bohlin Eva Onaindia Eugene H. Spafford Gintautas Dzemyda Gregory Kersten Janusz Kacprzyk

    University of Sheffield, UK Hong Kong Polytechnic University, China University of South Florida, USA KEDGE Business School and MRM, UM2, Montpellier, France Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Spain Purdue University, USA Vilnius University, Lithuania Concordia University, Canada Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland

    João Tavares Jon Hall Karl Stroetmann Kathleen Carley Keng Siau Salim Hariri Marjan Mernik Michael Koenig Miguel-Angel Sicilia Peter Sloot Reza Langari Robert J. Kauffman Wim Van Grembergen

    University of Porto, Portugal The Open University, UK Empirica Communication & Technology Research, Germany Carnegie Mellon University, USA Missouri University of Science and Technology, USA University of Arizona, USA University of Maribor, Slovenia Long Island University, USA Alcalá University, Spain University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands Texas A&M University, USA Singapore Management University, Singapore University of Antwerp, Belgium

    Program Committee Abdul Rauf Adnan Mahmood Adriana Peña Pérez Negrón Adriani Besimi Agostinho Sousa Pinto Ahmed El Oualkadi Alan Ramirez-Noriega Alberto Freitas Aleksandra Labus Alexandru Vulpe Ali Alsoufi Ali Idri Almir Souza Silva Neto Amit Shelef Ana Isabel Martins Ana Luis Anabela Tereso Anacleto Correia Anca Alexandra Purcarea André Marcos Silva Aneta Poniszewska-Maranda Angeles Quezada Ankur Singh Bist Antoni Oliver Antonio Borgia

    RISE SICS, Sweden Waterford Institute of Technology, Ireland Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico South East European University, Macedonia Polytecnic of Porto, Portugal Abdelmalek Essaadi University, Morocco Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Mexico FMUP, University of Porto, Portugal University of Belgrade, Serbia Politehnica University of Bucharest, Romania University of Bahrain, Bahrain ENSIAS, Mohammed V University, Morocco IFMA, Brazil Sapir Academic College, Israel University of Aveiro, Portugal University of Coimbra, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal CINAV, Portugal Politehnica University of Bucharest, Romania Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo (UNASP), Brazil Lodz University of Technology, Poland Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana, Mexico KIET, India University of the Balearic Islands, Spain University of Calabria, Italy

    Antonio Jiménez-Martín Antonio Pereira Armando Toda Arslan Enikeev Benedita Malheiro Borja Bordel Branko Perisic Carla Pinto Carla Santos Pereira Catarina Reis Cédric Gaspoz Cengiz Acarturk Cesar Collazos Christophe Feltus Christophe Soares Christos Bouras Ciro Martins Claudio Sapateiro Cristian García Bauza Cristian Mateos Daniel Lübke Dante Carrizo David Cortés-Polo Edita Butrime Edna Dias Canedo Eduardo Albuquerque Eduardo Santos Egils Ginters Eliana Leite Emiliano Reynares Evandro Costa Fatima Azzahra Amazal Fernando Bobillo Fernando Moreira Fernando Ribeiro Filipe Portela Filippo Neri Fionn Murtagh Firat Bestepe Fouzia Idrees Francesca Venneri

    Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain Polytechnic of Leiria, Portugal University of São Paulo, Brazil Kazan Federal University, Russia Polytechnic of Porto, ISEP, Portugal Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain Faculty of Technical Sciences, Serbia Polytechnic of Porto, ISEP, Portugal Universidade Portucalense, Portugal Polytechnic of Leiria, Portugal University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland (HES-SO), Switzerland Middle East Technical University, Turkey Universidad del Cauca, Colombia LIST, Luxembourg University Fernando Pessoa, Portugal University of Patras, Greece University of Aveiro, Portugal Polytechnic Institute of Setúbal, Portugal PLADEMA-UNICEN-CONICET, Argentina ISISTAN-CONICET, UNICEN, Argentina Leibniz Universität Hannover, Germany Universidad de Atacama, Chile Fundación COMPUTAEX, Spain Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania University of Brasilia, Brazil Federal University of Goiás, Brazil Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná, Brazil Riga Technical University, Latvia University of Minho, Portugal CONICET-CIDISI UTN FRSF, Argentina Federal University of Alagoas, Brazil Ibn Zohr University, Morocco University of Zaragoza, Spain Portucalense University, Portugal Polytechnic Castelo Branco, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal University of Naples, Italy University of Huddersfield, UK Republic of Turkey, Ministry of Development, Turkey Shaheed Benazir Bhutto Women University, Pakistan University of Calabria, Italy

    Francesco Bianconi Francisco García-Peñalvo Francisco Valverde Frederico Branco Gabriel Pestana Galim Vakhitov George Suciu Ghani Albaali Gian Piero Zarri Giuseppe Di Massa Gonçalo Paiva Dias Goreti Marreiros Graciela Lara López Habiba Drias Hafed Zarzour Hamid Alasadi Hatem Ben Sta Hector Fernando Gomez Alvarado Hélder Gomes Helia Guerra Henrique da Mota Silveira Henrique S. Mamede Hing Kai Chan Hugo Paredes Ibtissam Abnane Imen Ben Said Ina Schiering Inês Domingues Isabel Lopes Isabel Pedrosa Isaías Martins Ivan Lukovic Jan Kubicek Jean Robert Kala Kamdjoug Jesús Gallardo Casero Jezreel Mejia Jikai Li Jinzhi Lu Joao Carlos Silva

    Università degli Studi di Perugia, Italy University of Salamanca, Spain Universidad Central del Ecuador, Ecuador University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Portugal Universidade Europeia, Portugal Kazan Federal University, Russia BEIA, Romania Princess Sumaya University for Technology, Jordan University Paris-Sorbonne, France University of Calabria, Italy University of Aveiro, Portugal ISEP/GECAD, Portugal University of Guadalajara, Mexico University of Science and Technology Houari Boumediene, Algeria University of Souk Ahras, Algeria University of Basra, Iraq University of Tunis at El Manar, Tunisia Universidad Tecnica de Ambato, Ecuador University of Aveiro, Portugal University of the Azores, Portugal University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Brazil University Aberta, Portugal University of Nottingham Ningbo China, China INESC TEC and Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Portugal Mohammed V University in Rabat, Morocco Université de Sfax, Tunisia Ostfalia University of Applied Sciences, Germany University of Coimbra, Portugal Instituto Politécnico de Bragança, Portugal Coimbra Business School ISCAC, Portugal University of Leon, Spain University of Novi Sad, Serbia Technical University of Ostrava, Czech Republic Catholic University of Central Africa, Cameroon University of Zaragoza, Spain CIMAT Unidad Zacatecas, Mexico The College of New Jersey, USA KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden IPCA, Portugal

    João Manuel R. S. Tavares João Reis João Rodrigues Jorge Barbosa Jorge Buele Jorge Esparteiro Garcia Jorge Gomes Jorge Oliveira e Sá José Álvarez-García José Braga de Vasconcelos Jose Luis Herrero Agustin José Luís Reis Jose Luis Sierra Jose M. Parente de Oliveira José Machado José Martins Jose Torres José-Luís Pereira Juan Jesus Ojeda-Castelo Juan M. Santos Juan Pablo Damato Juncal Gutiérrez-Artacho Justyna Trojanowska Katsuyuki Umezawa Khalid Benali Korhan Gunel Krzysztof Wolk Kuan Yew Wong Laila Cheikhi Laura Varela-Candamio Laurentiu Boicescu Leonardo Botega Leonid Leonidovich Khoroshko Letícia Helena Januário Lila Rao-Graham Luis Alvarez Sabucedo Luis Mendes Gomes Luiz Rafael Andrade Luis Silva Rodrigues

    University of Porto, FEUP, Portugal University of Lisbon, Portugal University of Algarve, Portugal Polytecnic Institute of Coimbra, Portugal Technical University of Ambato, Ecuador Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo, Portugal University of Lisbon, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal University of Extremadura, Spain Universidade New Atlântica, Portugal University of Extremadura, Spain ISMAI, Portugal Complutense University of Madrid, Spain Aeronautics Institute of Technology, Brazil University of Minho, Portugal Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Portugal University Fernando Pessoa, Portugal Universidade do Minho, Portugal University of Almeria, Spain University of Vigo, Spain UNCPBA-CONICET, Argentina University of Granada, Spain Poznan University of Technology, Poland Shonan Institute of Technology, Japan LORIA, University of Lorraine, France Adnan Menderes University, Turkey Polish-Japanese Academy of Information Technology, Poland Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Malaysia Mohammed V University, Rabat, Morocco Universidade da Coruña, Spain E.T.T.I. U.P.B., Romania University Centre Eurípides of Marília (UNIVEM), Brazil Moscow Aviation Institute (National Research University), Russia Universidade Federal de São João del-Rei, Brazil University of the West Indies, Jamaica University of Vigo, Spain University of the Azores, Portugal Tiradentes University, Brazil Polytencic of Porto, Portugal

    Luz Sussy Bayona Oré Magdalena Diering Manuel Antonio Fernández-Villacañas Marín Manuel Pérez Cota Manuel Silva Manuel Tupia Marco Ronchetti Mareca María PIlar Marek Kvet María de la Cruz del Río-Rama Maria João Ferreira Maria João Varanda Pereira Maria José Sousa María Teresa García-Álvarez Marijana Despotovic-Zrakic Mário Antunes Marisa Maximiano Marisol Garcia-Valls Maristela Holanda Marius Vochin Marlene Goncalves da Silva Maroi Agrebi Martin Henkel Martín López Nores Martin Zelm Mawloud Mosbah Michal Adamczak Michal Kvet Miguel António Sovierzoski Mihai Lungu Milton Miranda Mircea Georgescu Mirna Muñoz Mohamed Hosni Mokhtar Amami Monica Leba

    Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Peru Poznan University of Technology, Poland Technical University of Madrid, Spain

    University of Vigo, Spain Polytechnic of Porto and INESC TEC, Portugal Pontifical Catholic University of Peru, Peru Università di Trento, Italy Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain Zilinska Univerzita v Ziline, Slovakia University of Vigo, Spain Universidade Portucalense, Portugal Polytechnic Institute of Bragança, Portugal University of Coimbra, Portugal University of A Coruna, Spain Faculty Organizational Science, Serbia Polytecnic of Leiria and CRACS INESC TEC, Portugal Polytechnic of Leiria, Portugal Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain University of Brasilia, Brazil E.T.T.I. U.P.B., Romania Universidad Simón Bolívar, Venezuela University of Polytechnique Hauts-de-France, France Stockholm University, Sweden University of Vigo, Spain INTEROP-VLab, Belgium University 20 Août 1955 of Skikda, Algeria Poznan School of Logistics, Poland University of Zilina, Slovakia Federal University of Technology - Paraná, Brazil Craiova University, Romania Federal University of Uberlândia, Brazil Al. I. Cuza University of Iasi, Romania Centro de Investigación en Matemáticas A.C., Mexico ENSIAS, Morocco Royal Military College of Canada, Canada University of Petrosani, Romania

    Muhammad Nawaz Mu-Song Chen Nastaran Hajiheydari Natalia Grafeeva Natalia Miloslavskaya Naveed Ahmed Nelson Rocha Nelson Salgado Nikolai Prokopyev Niranjan S. K. Noemi Emanuela Cazzaniga Noor Ahmed Noureddine Kerzazi Nuno Melão Nuno Octávio Fernandes Paôla Souza Patricia Zachman Paula Alexandra Rego Paula Viana Paulo Maio Paulo Novais Paweł Karczmarek Pedro Henriques Abreu Pedro Rangel Henriques Pedro Sobral Pedro Sousa Philipp Brune Piotr Kulczycki Prabhat Mahanti Radu-Emil Precup Rafael M. Luque Baena Rahim Rahmani Raiani Ali Ramayah T. Ramiro Delgado

    Institute of Management Sciences, Peshawar, Pakistan Dayeh University, China York St John University, UK Saint Petersburg State University, Russia National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Russia University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates University of Aveiro, Portugal Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador, Ecuador Kazan Federal University, Russia JSS Science and Technology University, India Politecnico di Milano, Italy AFRL/RI, USA Polytechnique Montréal, Canada Polytechnic of Viseu, Portugal Polytechnic Institute of Castelo Branco, Portugal Aeronautics Institute of Technology, Brazil Universidad Nacional del Chaco Austral, Argentina Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo and LIACC, Portugal Polytechnic of Porto and INESC TEC, Portugal Polytechnic of Porto, ISEP, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland University of Coimbra, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal University Fernando Pessoa, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal University of Applied Sciences Neu-Ulm, Germany Systems Research Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland University of New Brunswick, Canada Politehnica University of Timisoara, Romania University of Malaga, Spain Stockholm University, Sweden Bournemouth University, UK Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE, Ecuador

    Ramiro Gonçalves Ramon Alcarria Ramon Fabregat Gesa Reyes Juárez Ramírez Rui Jose Rui Pitarma Rui S. Moreira Rustam Burnashev Saeed Salah Said Achchab Sajid Anwar Salama Mostafa Sami Habib Samuel Fosso Wamba Sanaz Kavianpour Sandra Costanzo Sandra Patricia Cano Mazuera Sergio Albiol-Pérez Shahnawaz Talpur Silviu Vert Simona Mirela Riurean Slawomir Zolkiewski Solange N. Alves-Souza Solange Rito Lima Sorin Zoican Souraya Hamida Stefan Pickl Sümeyya Ilkin Syed Asim Ali Taoufik Rachad Tatiana Antipova The Thanh Van Thomas Weber Timothy Asiedu Tom Sander Tomaž Klobučar Toshihiko Kato Tzung-Pei Hong

    University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro and INESC TEC, Portugal Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain University of Girona, Spain Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Mexico University of Minho, Portugal Polytechnic Institute of Guarda, Portugal UFP & INESC TEC & LIACC, Portugal Kazan Federal University, Russia Al-Quds University, Palestine Mohammed V University in Rabat, Morocco Institute of Management Sciences, Peshawar, Pakistan Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Malaysia Kuwait University, Kuwait Toulouse Business School, France University of Technology, Malaysia University of Calabria, Italy University of San Buenaventura Cali, Colombia University of Zaragoza, Spain Mehran University of Engineering and Technology, Jamshoro, Pakistan Politehnica University of Timisoara, Romania University of Petrosani, Romania Silesian University of Technology, Poland University of São Paulo, Brazil University of Minho, Portugal Polytechnica University of Bucharest, Romania University of Batna 2, Algeria UBw München COMTESSA, Germany Kocaeli University, Turkey University of Karachi, Pakistan Mohammed V University, Morocco Institute of certified Specialists, Russia HCMC University of Food Industry, Vietnam EPFL, Switzerland TIM Technology Services Ltd., Ghana New College of Humanities, Germany Jozef Stefan Institute, Slovenia University of Electro-Communications, Japan National University of Kaohsiung, Taiwan

    Valentina Colla Veronica Segarra Faggioni Victor Alves Victor Georgiev Victor Hugo Medina Garcia Vincenza Carchiolo Vitalyi Igorevich Talanin Wolf Zimmermann Yadira Quiñonez Yair Wiseman Yuhua Li Yuwei Lin Yves Rybarczyk Zorica Bogdanovic

    Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Italy Private Technical University of Loja, Ecuador University of Minho, Portugal Kazan Federal University, Russia Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas, Colombia University of Catania, Italy Zaporozhye Institute of Economics and Information Technologies, Ukraine Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany Autonomous University of Sinaloa, Mexico Bar-Ilan University, Israel Cardiff University, UK University of Roehampton, UK Universidad de Las Américas, Ecuador University of Belgrade, Serbia

    Workshops First Workshop on Air Quality and Open Data: Challenges for Data Science, HCI and AI Organizing Committee Kai v. Luck Susanne Draheim Jessica Broscheit Martin Kohler

    Creative Space for Technical Innovation, HAW Hamburg, Germany Creative Space for Technical Innovation, HAW Hamburg, Germany Artist, Hamburg, Germany HafenCity University Hamburg, Germany

    Program Committee Ingo Börsch

    Susanne Draheim Stefan Wölwer

    Technische Hochschule Brandenburg, Brandenburg University of Applied Sciences, Germany Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Germany HAWK University of Applied Sciences and Arts Hildesheim/Holzminden/Goettingen, Germany Creative Space for Technical Innovation, HAW Hamburg, Germany

    Tim Tiedemann Marcelo Tramontano

    Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Germany University of São Paulo, Brazil

    Second Workshop on Digital Transformation Organizing Committee Fernando Moreira Ramiro Gonçalves Manuel Au-Yong Oliveira José Martins Frederico Branco

    Universidade Universidade Portugal Universidade Universidade Portugal Universidade Portugal

    Portucalense, Portugal de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, de Aveiro, Portugal de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro,

    Program Committee Alex Sandro Gomes Arnaldo Martins César Collazos Jezreel Mejia Jörg Thomaschewski Lorna Uden Manuel Ortega Manuel Peréz Cota Martin Schrepp Philippe Palanque Rosa Vicardi Vitor Santos

    Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Brazil Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal Universidad del Cauca, Colombia Centro de Investigación en Matemáticas A.C., Mexico University of Applied Sciences, Germany Staffordshire University, UK Universidad de Castilla–La Mancha, Spain Universidade de Vigo, Spain SAP SE, Germany Université Toulouse III, France Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil NOVA IMS Information Management School, Portugal

    First Workshop on Empirical Studies in the Domain of Social Network Computing Organizing Committee Shahid Hussain Arif Ali Khan Nafees Ur Rehman

    COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, China University of Konstanz, Germany

    Program Committee Abdul Mateen Aoutif Amine Gwanggil Jeon Hanna Hachimi Jacky Keung Kifayat Alizai

    Kwabena Bennin Ebo Mansoor Ahmad Manzoor Ilahi Mariam Akbar Muhammad Khalid Sohail Muhammad Shahid Salima Banqdara Siti Salwa Salim Wiem Khlif

    Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science & Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan ENSA, Ibn Tofail University, Morocco Incheon National University, Korea ENSA of Kenitra, Ibn Tofail University, Morocco City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong National University of Computer and Emerging Sciences (FAST-NUCES), Islamabad, Pakistan City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong COMSATS University Islamabad, Pakistan COMSATS University Islamabad, Pakistan COMSATS University Islamabad, Pakistan COMSATS University Islamabad, Pakistan Gomal University, DIK, Pakistan University of Benghazi, Libya University of Malaya, Malaysia University of Sfax, Tunisia

    First Workshop on Health Technology Innovation: Emerging Trends and Future Challenges Organizing Committee Eliana Silva Joyce Aguiar Victor Carvalho Joaquim Gonçalves

    University of Minho & Optimizer, Portugal University of Minho & Optimizer, Portugal Optimizer, Portugal Instituto Politécnico do Cávado e do Ave & Optimizer, Portugal

    Program Committee Eliana Silva Joyce Aguiar Victor Carvalho Joaquim Gonçalves

    University of Minho & Optimizer, Portugal University of Minho & Optimizer, Portugal Optimizer, Portugal Instituto Politécnico do Cávado e do Ave & Optimizer, Portugal

    Fifth Workshop on Healthcare Information Systems Interoperability, Security and Efficiency Organizing Committee José Machado António Abelha

    University of Minho, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal

    Luis Mendes Gomes Anastasius Mooumtzoglou

    University of Azores, Portugal European Society for Quality in Healthcare, Greece

    Program Committee Alberto Freitas Ana Azevedo Ângelo Costa Armando B. Mendes Cesar Analide Davide Carneiro Filipe Portela Goreti Marreiros Helia Guerra Henrique Vicente Hugo Peixoto Jason Jung Joao Ramos José Martins Jose Neves Júlio Duarte Luis Mendes Gomes Manuel Filipe Santos Paulo Moura Oliveira Paulo Novais Teresa Guarda Victor Alves

    University of Porto, Portugal ISCAP/IPP, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal University of Azores, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Portugal University of Azores, Portugal University of Évora, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal Chung-Ang University, Korea University of Minho, Portugal UTAD, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal University of Azores, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal UTAD, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal Universidad Estatal da Península de Santa Elena, Ecuador University of Minho, Portugal

    Fourth Workshop on New Pedagogical Approaches with Technologies Organizing Committee Anabela Mesquita Paula Peres Fernando Moreira

    ISCAP/P.Porto and Algoritmi Centre, Portugal ISCAP/P.Porto and Unit for e-Learning and Pedagogical Innovation, Portugal IJP and REMIT – Univ Portucalense & IEETA – Univ Aveiro, Portugal

    Program Committee Alex Gomes Ana R. Luís

    Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Brazil Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal

    Armando Silva César Collazos Chia-Wen Tsai João Batista Lino Oliveira Luisa M. Romero Moreno Manuel Pérez Cota Paulino Silva Ramiro Gonçalves Rosa Vicari Stefania Manca

    ESE/IPP, Portugal Universidad del Cauca, Colombia Ming Chuan University, Taiwan CICE/ISCA, UA, Portugal ESMAD/IPP, Portugal Universidade de Sevilha, Espanha Universidade de Vigo, Espanha CICE & CECEJ-ISCAP/IPP, Portugal UTAD, Vila Real, Portugal Universidade de Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil Instituto per le Tecnologie Didattiche, Italy

    Fifth Workshop on Pervasive Information Systems Organizing Committee Carlos Filipe Portela Manuel Filipe Santos Kostas Kolomvatsos

    Department of Information Systems, University of Minho, Portugal Department of Information Systems, University of Minho, Portugal Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece

    Program Committee Andre Aquino Carlo Giannelli Cristina Alcaraz Daniele Riboni Fabio A. Schreiber Filipe Mota Pinto Hugo Peixoto Gabriel Pedraza Ferreira Jarosław Jankowski José Machado Juan-Carlos Cano Karolina Baras Muhammad Younas Nuno Marques Rajeev Kumar Kanth

    Federal University of Alagoas, Brazil University of Ferrara, Italy University of Malaga, Spain University of Milan, Italy Politecnico Milano, Italy Polytechnic of Leiria, Portugal University of Minho, Portugal Universidad Industrial de Santander, Colombia West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland University of Minho, Portugal Universitat Politècnica de València, Spain University of Madeira, Portugal Oxford Brookes University, UK New University of Lisboa, Portugal Turku Centre for Computer Science, University of Turku, Finland

    Ricardo Queirós Sergio Ilarri Spyros Panagiotakis

    ESMAD- P.PORTO & CRACS - INESC TEC, Portugal University of Zaragoza, Spain Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Greece

    Information and Knowledge Management My Employer’s Prestige, My Prestige . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tom Sander and Phoey Lee Teh

    The Four Major Factors Impacting on the Future of Work . . . . . . . . . Michal Beno

    The Future of the Digital Workforce: Current and Future Challenges for Executive and Administrative Assistants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anabela Mesquita, Luciana Oliveira, and Arminda Sequeira Project Management Practices at Portuguese Startups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anabela Tereso, Celina P. Leão, and Tobias Ribeiro

    The Application of Clustering Techniques to Group Archaeological Artifacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N. Mikhailova, E. Mikhailova, and N. Grafeeva

    Segmentation of Magnetic Anomalies in the Conduct of Archaeological Excavations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sofya Ilinykh, Natalia Grafeeva, Elena Mikhailova, and Olga Egorova

    Automatic Document Annotation with Data Mining Algorithms . . . . . . Alda Canito, Goreti Marreiros, and Juan Manuel Corchado

    Generation Z and the Technology Use During a Trip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pedro Liberato, Cátia Aires, Dália Liberato, and Álvaro Rocha

    Information and Communication Technologies in Creative and Sustainable Tourism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ana Ferreira, Pedro Liberato, Dália Liberato, and Álvaro Rocha

    The Importance of Project Management Competences: A Case Study in Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Eliane Gonzales Meirelles, Anabela Tereso, and Cláudio Santos xxi

    Improvement of Industrialization Projects Management: An Automotive Industry Case Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Diana Fernandes, Anabela Tereso, and Gabriela Fernandes A Digital Strategy for SMEs in the Retail Business that Allows the Increase of Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Alesandro Anthony Huayllas Iriarte, Betsy Andrea Reinaltt Higa, Alfredo Barrientos Padilla, and Rosario Villalta Riega Multi-split HDFS Technique for Improving Data Confidentiality in Big Data Replication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Mostafa R. Kaseb, Mohamed H. Khafagy, Ihab A. Ali, and ElSayed M. Saad Social Media, Evolutionary Psychology, and ISIS: A Literature Review and Future Research Directions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Sylvie Borau and Samuel Fosso Wamba Improvement of the Applicability of the General Data Protection Regulation in Health Clinics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Isabel Maria Lopes, Teresa Guarda, and Pedro Oliveira The Use of LinkedIn for ICT Recruitment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Guilherme Pinho, João Arantes, Tiago Marques, Frederico Branco, and Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira The Role of Technologies: Creating a New Labour Market . . . . . . . . . . 176 Ana Isabel Vieira, Eva Oliveira, Francisca Silva, Marco Oliveira, Ramiro Gonçalves, and Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira Hybrid Machine Translation Oriented to Cross-Language Information Retrieval: English-Spanish Error Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 Juncal Gutiérrez-Artacho, María-Dolores Olvera-Lobo, and Irene Rivera-Trigueros Fake News and Social Networks: How Users Interact with Fake Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira, Carlota P. A. Carlos, Hugo Pintor, João Caires, and Julia Zanoni What Will the Future Bring? The Impact of Automation on Skills and (Un)employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira, Ana Carina Almeida, Ana Rita Arromba, Cátia Fernandes, and Inês Cardoso Ambient Assisted Living – A Bibliometric Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 João Viana, André Ramalho, José Valente, and Alberto Freitas

    A Taboo-Search Algorithm for 3D-Binpacking Problem in Containers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 Paul Leon, Rony Cueva, Manuel Tupia, and Gonçalo Paiva Dias Artificial Intelligence in Government Services: A Systematic Literature Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 João Reis, Paula Espírito Santo, and Nuno Melão Ontology Driven Feedforward Risk Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 Cédric Gaspoz, Ulysse Rosselet, Mathias Rossi, and Mélanie Thomet Incremental Hotel Recommendation with Inter-guest Trust and Similarity Post-filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 Fátima Leal, Benedita Malheiro, and Juan Carlos Burguillo Traffic Flow Forecasting on Data-Scarce Environments Using ARIMA and LSTM Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 Bruno Fernandes, Fábio Silva, Hector Alaiz-Moretón, Paulo Novais, Cesar Analide, and José Neves Mapping Clinical Practice Guidelines to SWRL Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 Samia Sbissi, Mariem Mahfoudh, and Said Gattoufi Towards the Automatic Construction of an Intelligent Tutoring System: Domain Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293 Alan Ramírez-Noriega, Yobani Martínez-Ramírez, José Emilio Sánchez García, Erasmo Miranda Bojórquez, J. Francisco Figueroa Pérez, José Mendivil-Torres, and Sergio Miranda Deep Learning and Sub-Word-Unit Approach in Written Art Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 Krzysztof Wołk, Emilia Zawadzka-Gosk, and Wojciech Czarnowski Toward a Knowledge Sharing-Aimed Virtual Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . 316 Nastaran Hajiheydari, Mojtaba Talafidaryani, and SeyedHossein Khabiri Towards the Digital Transformation: Are Portuguese Organizations in This Way? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326 Carla Santos Pereira, Fernando Moreira, Natércia Durão, and Maria João Ferreira Validation and Evaluation of the Mapping Process for Generating Ontologies from Relational Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337 Bilal Benmahria, Ilham Chaker, and Azeddine Zahi ERP Conceptual Ecology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351 Fernando Bento, Carlos J. Costa, and Manuela Aparicio

    Data Quality Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361 Alexandra Oliveira, Rita Gaio, Pilar Baylina, Carlos Rebelo, and Luís Paulo Reis Contextualising the National Cyber Security Capacity in an Unstable Environment: A Spring Land Case Study . . . . . . . . . . . 373 Mohamed Altaher Ben Naseir, Huseyin Dogan, Edward Apeh, Christopher Richardson, and Raian Ali EU General Data Protection Regulation Implementation: An Institutional Theory View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 383 Isabel Maria Lopes, Teresa Guarda, and Pedro Oliveira Design of a Situation-Awareness Solution to Support Infrastructure Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394 Carme Vidal Quintáns and Gabriel Pestana A Systematic Literature Review in Blockchain: Benefits and Implications of the Technology for Business . . . . . . . . . . . 405 João Pedro Marques Ferreira, Maria José Angélico Gonçalves, and Amélia Ferreira da Silva SPAINChain: Security, Privacy, and Ambient Intelligence in Negotiation Between IOT and Blockchain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415 Mohamed A. El-dosuky and Gamal H. Eladl Ontology Supporting Model-Based Systems Engineering Based on a GOPPRR Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426 Hongwei Wang, Guoxin Wang, Jinzhi Lu, and Changfeng Ma A Multi-agent System Framework for Dialogue Games in the Group Decision-Making Context . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 437 João Carneiro, Patrícia Alves, Goreti Marreiros, and Paulo Novais Employee Performance Evaluation Within the Economic Management System of the Spanish Air Force: Development of a Methodology and an Optimization Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 448 Manuel A. Fernández-Villacañas Marín Improving Control Effectiveness in IS Development Projects Through Participatory Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 456 Roman Walser DSL Based Automatic Generation of Q&A Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 460 Renato Preigschadt de Azevedo, Maria João Varanda Pereira, and Pedro Rangel Henriques On Semantic Search Algorithm Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472 Alexander Gusenkov and Naille Bukharaev

    Predict the Personality of Facebook Profiles Using Automatic Learning Techniques and BFI Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482 Graciela Guerrero, Elvis Sarchi, and Freddy Tapia A Review on Relations Extraction in Police Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494 Gonçalo Carnaz, Paulo Quaresma, Vitor Beires Nogueira, Mário Antunes, and Nuno N. M. Fonseca Ferreira Towards a Personalised Recommender Platform for Sportswomen . . . . 504 Juan M. Santos-Gago, Luis Álvarez-Sabucedo, Roberto González-Maciel, Víctor M. Alonso-Rorís, José L. García-Soidán, Carmina Wanden-Berghe, and Javier Sanz-Valero Trusted Data’s Marketplace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515 António Brandão, Henrique São Mamede, and Ramiro Gonçalves A NoSQL Solution for Bioinformatics Data Provenance Storage . . . . . . 528 Ingrid Santana, Waldeyr Mendes C. da Silva, and Maristela Holanda DOORchain: Deep Ontology-Based Operation Research to Detect Malicious Smart Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 538 Mohamed A. El-Dosuky and Gamal H. Eladl A Smart Cache Strategy for Tag-Based Browsing of Digital Collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 546 Joaquín Gayoso-Cabada, Mercedes Gómez-Albarrán, and José-Luis Sierra Identifying Most Probable Negotiation Scenario in Bilateral Contracts with Reinforcement Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 556 Francisco Silva, Tiago Pinto, Isabel Praça, and Zita Vale Organizational Models and Information Systems Using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in SAP Fiori . . . . . . . . 575 Daniela Beselga and Bráulio Alturas Evaluation of Local E-government Maturity in the Lima Metropolitan Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585 Gonçalo Paiva Dias, Manuel Tupia, and José Manuel Magallanes Reyes An Approach to GDPR Based on Object Role Modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . 595 António Gonçalves, Anacleto Correia, and Luís Cavique A Study over NoSQL Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603 Pedro Martins, Maryam Abbasi, and Filipe Sá A New Model for Evaluation of Human Resources: Case Study of Catering Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 612 João Paulo Pereira, Natalya Efanova, and Ivan Slesarenko

    A Governing Framework for Data-Driven Small Organizations in Colombia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 622 Diana Heredia-Vizcaíno and Wilson Nieto Critical Success Factors for Corporate Data Quality Management . . . . 630 Ana Lucas Solutions for Data Quality in GIS and VGI: A Systematic Literature Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 645 Gabriel Medeiros and Maristela Holanda Use of the Lean Methodology to Reduce Truck Repair Time: A Case Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 655 Alexander Börger, Javiera Alfaro, and Priscila León Proposal to Avoid Issues in the DevOps Implementation: A Systematic Literature Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 666 Mirna Muñoz, Mario Negrete, and Jezreel Mejía Role of Green HRM Practices in Employees’ Pro-environmental IT Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678 Adedapo Oluwaseyi Ojo and Murali Raman Innovation Trends for Smart Factories: A Literature Review . . . . . . . . 689 Maria José Sousa, Rui Cruz, Álvaro Rocha, and Miguel Sousa Open Government Data in Kingdom of Bahrain: Towards an Effective Implementation Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 699 Abdull-Kareem Katbi and Jaflah Al-Ammary Modelling Reporting Delays in a Multilevel Structured Surveillance System - Application to Portuguese HIV-AIDS Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 716 Alexandra Oliveira, Humberta Amorim, Rita Gaio, and Luís Paulo Reis Study of a Successful ERP Implementation Using an Extended Information Systems Success Model in Cameroon Universities: Case of CUCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 727 Chris Emmanuel Tchatchouang Wanko, Jean Robert Kala Kamdjoug, and Samuel Fosso Wamba Conceptual Approach for an Extension to a Mushroom Farm Distributed Process Control System: IoT and Blockchain . . . . . . . . . . . 738 Frederico Branco, Fernando Moreira, José Martins, Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira, and Ramiro Gonçalves Improving Automatic BPMN Layouting by Experimentally Evaluating User Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 748 Tobias Scholz and Daniel Lübke

    Drone Based DSM Reconstruction for Flood Simulations in Small Areas: A Pilot Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 758 P. Rinaldi, I. Larrabide, and J. P. D’Amato Web Application for Management of Scientific Conferences . . . . . . . . . 765 João Bioco and Alvaro Rocha Localizing Inconsistencies into Software Process Models at a Conceptual Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775 Noureddine Kerzazi Software and Systems Modeling On the Practicality of Subspace Tracking in Information Systems . . . . . 791 Noor Ahmed and Gregory Hasseler A Model-Driven Approach for the Integration of Hardware Nodes in the IoT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801 Darwin Alulema, Javier Criado, and Luis Iribarne Multiphase CFD Simulation of Photogrammetry 3D Model for UAV Crop Spraying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 812 Héctor Guillermo Parra, Victor Daniel Angulo Morales, and Elvis Eduardo Gaona Garcia Towards a Taxonomy of Software Maintainability Predictors . . . . . . . . 823 Sara Elmidaoui, Laila Cheikhi, and Ali Idri A BPMN Extension for Business Process Outsourcing to the Cloud . . . 833 Karim Zarour, Djamel Benmerzoug, Nawal Guermouche, and Khalil Drira A Computational Modeling Based on Trigonometric Cubic B-Spline Functions for the Approximate Solution of a Second Order Partial Integro-Differential Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 844 Arshed Ali, Kamil Khan, Fazal Haq, and Syed Inayat Ali Shah Addressing Fine-Grained Variability in User-Centered Software Product Lines: A Case Study on Dashboards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 855 Andrea Vázquez-Ingelmo, Francisco J. García-Peñalvo, and Roberto Therón Estimate of Discharge of Lithium-Ion Batteries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 865 Erick Frota da Costa, Darielson Araújo de Souza, Miquéias Silva Araújo, Vandilberto Pereira Pinto, Artur Melo Peixoto, and Erivaldo Pinheiro da Costa Júnior Study of the Number Recognition Algorithms Efficiency After a Reduction of the Characteristic Space Using Typical Testors . . . . . . . 875 Kuntur Muenala, Julio Ibarra-Fiallo, and Monserrate Intriago-Pazmiño

    Patterns of Ambiguity in Textual Requirements Specification . . . . . . . . 886 David Šenkýř and Petr Kroha 3D Simulator Based on SimTwo to Evaluate Algorithms in Micromouse Competition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 896 Lucas Eckert, Luis Piardi, José Lima, Paulo Costa, Antonio Valente, and Alberto Nakano Towards Forest Fire Prevention and Combat Through Citizen Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 904 João Bioco and Paulo Fazendeiro An Approach for Migrating Legacy Applications to Mobile Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 916 Viviana Cajas, Matías Urbieta, Yves Rybarczyk, Gustavo Rossi, and César Guevara Designing IoT Infrastructure for Neuromarketing Research . . . . . . . . . 928 Tatjana Vasiljević, Zorica Bogdanović, Branka Rodić, Tamara Naumović, and Aleksandra Labus Extraction of Fact Tables from a Relational Database: An Effort to Establish Rules in Denormalization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 936 Luís Cavique, Mariana Cavique, and António Gonçalves Deep Learning in State-of-the-Art Image Classification Exceeding 99% Accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 946 Emilia Zawadzka-Gosk, Krzysztof Wołk, and Wojciech Czarnowski Absenteeism Prediction in Call Center Using Machine Learning Algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 958 Evandro Lopes de Oliveira, José M. Torres, Rui S. Moreira, and Rafael Alexandre França de Lima Author Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 969

    Information and Knowledge Management

    My Employer’s Prestige, My Prestige Tom Sander1(&) and Phoey Lee Teh2 1

    New College of the Humanities, London, UK [email protected] 2 Department of Computing and Information Systems, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sunway University, Subang Jaya, Malaysia [email protected]

    Abstract. Employer branding is an essential component that attracts potential candidates to companies. Social media, particularly employer rating platforms, provide many opportunities to present a company’s employer brand. Individuals use these platforms to collect information and evaluations about potential employers and companies could utilise these platforms to present themselves favourably. Based on social capital theory, this study examined the variables of support and benefit as reasons why individuals share information about their employers on employer rating platforms. The influence of demographic factors on the use of these platforms was also investigated. Data was collected from 309 respondents via an online survey, and analysed using the t-test, Spearman’s correlation, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the least significant difference (LSD) method. Only descriptive statistics, distribution of responses, and statistically significant results are presented. Keywords: Employer branding Social media  Recruitment

     Rating platforms  Social capital 

    1 Introduction The labour market is currently changing to a candidate’s market where there is demand for skilled employees but the number of potential candidates to meet this demand is decreasing. Labour market is refers to the availability of employment and labour, in terms of supply and demand. The market becomes more competitive and companies are finding it difficult to identify suitable employees from the pool of candidates (Sander 2013). Moreover, the importance of employer branding—how companies project themselves as favourable employers—is increasing. One way that companies can brand themselves positively is through the Internet. The Internet is a powerful word-of-mouth marketing platform (Mukherjee and Banerjee 2017). The exchange of information, experience and knowledge in digital media creates value for a company. The value of information available allow individuals to aid in their decision-making. For example, TripAdvisor serves as a hotelrating platform for travellers and as a way for hotels to improve their service based on ratings. The consistency in ratings, either good or bad, influences a traveller’s decision when selecting a hotel (Khoo et al. 2017). © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019 Á. Rocha et al. (Eds.): WorldCIST'19 2019, AISC 930, pp. 3–11, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-16181-1_1

    Social media provide new channels for job seekers to collect and share information about potential employers. These channels can be used by anyone with access to the Internet, making information easily accessible and available worldwide. It has become increasingly common for employees to share information with each other about their employers on social media. Job seekers could use such exchange of information when considering which company to apply to (Balaji et al. 2016 Luarn et al. 2015). Companies’ reputations are also at stakes as a negative report about them can be read by anyone anytime (Vergeer 2014). Job seekers might not apply to a company that has been rated negatively. As such, companies could use employer rating platforms to brand themselves positively and therefore, reduce destructive criticism. Employer rating platforms are online software-based tools that employees used to evaluate companies (Dabirian et al. 2017). Job seekers turn to these platforms to seek realistic and authentic information about potential employers (Li and Bernoff 2011 Sander et al. 2017). Individuals are able to anonymously share information such as company culture, benefits, and leadership behaviour as well as describe their working experience on these platforms (Teh et al. 2014 Wasko 2005). Due to the anonymity of these accounts, the information is deemed to be genuine and hence, trusted by job seekers (Bakir and McStay 2017). Individuals also use this channel to support each other, such as by encouraging (or discouraging) job seekers in applying to a particular company. Some companies use employer rating platforms to advertise themselves to potential candidates. They would use their employees as company ambassadors by asking them to rate the companies favourably. In short, these platforms provide an opportunity for employees to evaluate their companies and also for companies to react to these evaluations and communicate with potential candidates. Previously, research has conducted on the reason of how to attract potential candidates to apply to their company through rating platform. The rating of the employees supports the success of the recruiting process which candidates have information to find for as a decision (Sander et al. 2015). The question of “Why would you evaluate your employer on an employer rating platform (e.g. Kununu or Glassdoor)?” has resulted in several feedbacks such as “I like to support my employer to be recognised as a good employer”, “I like to inform other people about my employer” and “I like to motivate potential candidates to apply”. These comments have exhibited the support of the employer to pursue suitable candidates for the company and the ratings or comments of the employees inform other people about an employer. To reiterate, information on employer rating platforms is deemed authentic as it came from the employees themselves and not from the company’s branding or marketing department or communications officer. Individuals place more trust in information from “normal” employees as compared to information given by companies media centre or communication department (Klein et al. 2012). This is an advantage of employer rating platforms and the power of word-of-mouth. The current study aimed to identify the reasons that motivate individuals to share information about their employers on employer rating platforms. To explore the benefit of employer rating platform is to present the prestige of the employer (Sander et al. 2017). Could a positive image of the employer increase the prestige of their employees? Could the prestige of an employer motivate suitable candidates to apply to the company? Employees would want experienced and suitable colleagues, which are

    My Employer’s Prestige, My Prestige

    essential for companies to be successful. Hence, employees evaluate their company on rating platforms to ensure that the company show one´s true colour. Successful and competitive companies are a motivation for employees to work there as company success secures the employment and survival of the company.

    2 Motivators to Share Information on Employer Rating Platforms Social capital theory explains the exchange of information in social networks (Finkbeiner 2013). The Internet, particularly social media, has become an accepted channel or opinion-mining platform to share and obtain information. With the Internet, individuals have easy access to resources and information without any cost (Fussell et al. 2006). As the Internet creates large networks that connect people and is an infinite source of information, it has become a place to exchange knowledge and experience. Individuals can refer to these platforms to aid in their own decision-making or influence the decisions of others. For employees, employer rating platforms are a place to share and exchange information as well as obtain needed information on companies (Hampton et al. 2011). In a way, individuals support one another by providing information or resources to each other. Such information or resources might not be obtainable if individuals did not receive such support. Individuals tend to receive information or resources from a third party, sometimes anonymous, via the Internet. This form of support is from an external source such as a machine, a rating platform or a person (Moon 2004). Hence, this leads to the first statement of the study examining the variable of support: “Individuals use employer rating platforms to exchange information about their employers to support other individuals”

    Benefits are a valuable resource that improves the situation of an individual (e.g. prestige increases prosperity). Benefits have a positive influence on the individual and are hence desirable. A typical online benefit is the reputation and trust of information (Daigremont et al. 2008 Ellison et al. 2007), which are important for online users to obtain power and influence over others. Online users expect individuals that use their provided information to be obliged to them (Hampton and Wellman 2003 Hlebec et al. 2006). Thus, this leads to the second statement of the study examining the variable of benefit: “Individuals provide information on employer rating platforms to seek benefits”

    The current study also investigated if demographic factors would influence the use of employer rating platforms. Demographic factors are important for the labour market and decision to select employees. The demographic factors tested in this study consisted of age, work experience, gender, and education level. This leads to the third statement of the study: “The use of employer rating platforms is influenced by demographic factors”

    3 Methodology The study was carried out in cooperation with a project at University of Ludwigshafen, Germany. As employer rating platforms are online tools (Evans and Mathur 2005 Wright 2005), the study recruited individuals with access to the Internet. An online survey conducted in the German language was forwarded randomly to over 900 individuals between November and December 2017, but only 309 individuals responded. In terms of age, 2.5% of respondents were below 21 years, 57.6% were between 21 and 30 years, 6% were between 31 and 40 years, and 18.5% were above 40 years. Young individuals aged between 21 and 30 years formed the majority of respondents. These are individuals who have familiarised themselves with social media and rating platforms, using them in their daily life to evaluate products and services online (Miguéns et al. 2008). These platforms are an important marketing tool that young individuals trust and use when it comes to making a decision. In terms of gender, 38.1% of respondents were male while the remaining 61.9% were female. As for education level, 30% of respondents have a school degree, 40.6% have an apprenticeship, 18.7% have a three-year university degree, 9.5% have a university degree of more than three years, and 1.2% have a doctorate degree or higher. The survey comprised five items related to employment, rated on a 6-point Likert scale ranging from stages 1 (full agreement) to 6 (full disagreement). Survey’s responses were analysed using the t-test, Spearman’s correlation, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the least significant difference (LSD) method. Descriptive statistics, distribution of responses, and only statistically significant results are presented in the paper.

    4 Results The descriptive statistics presented in Table 1 show differences between the two variables, support and benefit. All items measuring support have a mode of 2, two items have a median of 2, and one item has a median of 3. In other words, the opinion to use employer rating platforms to transfer and share information is confirmed. On the other hand, the two items measuring benefit have a mode of 3 and 6 and a median of 3 and 4 respectively, indicating responses closer to full disagreement in the Likert scale.

    Table 1. Descriptive statistics of survey responses Item

    Mean Median Mode Standard deviation I like to support my employer to be recognised as a 308 2.67 2 2 1.391 good employer I like to inform other people about my employer 309 2.65 2 2 1.379 I like to motivate potential candidates to apply 308 2.79 3 2 1.471 I like to provide feedback to my employer on an 308 2.97 3 3 1.540 anonymous channel Because the positive prestige of my employer has a 307 4.12 4 6 1.610 positive influence on my prestige

    My Employer’s Prestige, My Prestige

    The distribution of responses presented in Table 2 confirms the results and tendencies for all items. The first four items have a weak tendency to the stages 1 to 3. Surprisingly, the fifth item is the only item that exhibits a percentage of over 63.8% for stages 4 to 6. The fourth items averagely constitute 67.9% for stages 1 to 3. The results indicate a clear tendency of individuals using employer rating platforms to support other individuals. However, the results are not clear on whether or not individuals use employer rating platforms to seek benefits. Table 2. Distribution of survey responses, Results presented in percentage (%) N = 307 – 309 Item

    1 (full 2 3 4 5 6 (full Stage agreement) disagreement) 1–3 22.7 25.6 22.4 15.3 7.5 6.5 70.7

    I like to motivate potential candidates to apply 20.7 I like to inform other people about my employer 20.1 I like to support my employer to be recognized as a good employer 19.5 I like to provide feedback to my employer on an anonymous channel 7.2 Because the positive prestige of my employer has a positive influence on my prestige


    BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

    The present disclosure is described in conjunction with the appended figures:

    FIG. 1 illustrates a block diagram that provides an illustration of the hardware components of a computing system, according to some embodiments of the present technology.

    FIG. 2 illustrates an example network including an example set of devices communicating with each other over an exchange system and via a network, according to some embodiments of the present technology.

    FIG. 3 illustrates a representation of a conceptual model of a communications protocol system, according to some embodiments of the present technology.

    FIG. 4 illustrates a communications grid computing system including a variety of control and worker nodes, according to some embodiments of the present technology.

    FIG. 5 illustrates a flow chart showing an example process for adjusting a communications grid or a work project in a communications grid after a failure of a node, according to some embodiments of the present technology.

    FIG. 6 illustrates a portion of a communications grid computing system including a control node and a worker node, according to some embodiments of the present technology.

    FIG. 7 illustrates a flow chart showing an example process for executing a data analysis or processing project, according to some embodiments of the present technology.

    FIG. 8 illustrates a block diagram including components of an Event Stream Processing Engine (ESPE), according to embodiments of the present technology.

    FIG. 9 illustrates a flow chart showing an example process performed by an event stream processing engine, according to some embodiments of the present technology.

    FIG. 10 illustrates an ESP system interfacing between a publishing device and multiple event subscribing devices, according to embodiments of the present technology.

    FIG. 11 provides an example of a structure definition.

    FIG. 12 provides an example of a transition matrix for transitions between component states.

    FIG. 13 provides an example of an output flow of component state distributions.

    FIG. 14 provides an example of a transition matrix for transitions between component states.

    FIG. 15 provides an example of an output flow of component state distributions.

    FIG. 16 provides an overview of a process for stress testing.

    FIG. 17 provides a plot showing simulated output flows for one component state for a Markov case and a variety of simulation cases.

    FIG. 18 provides a plot showing simulated output flows for one component state for a Markov case and a variety of simulation cases.

    FIG. 19 provides a plot showing simulated output flows for one component state for a Markov case and a variety of simulation cases.

    In the appended figures, similar components and/or features can have the same reference label. Further, various components of the same type can be distinguished by following the reference label by a dash and a second label that distinguishes among the similar components. If only the first reference label is used in the specification, the description is applicable to any one of the similar components having the same first reference label irrespective of the second reference label.


    Artificial intelligence based cognitive routing for cognitive radio networks

    Cognitive radio networks (CRNs) are networks of nodes equipped with cognitive radios that can optimize performance by adapting to network conditions. Although various routing protocols incorporating varying degrees of adaptiveness and cognition have been proposed for CRNs, these works have mostly been limited by their system-level focus (that emphasizes optimization at the level of an individual cognitive radio system). The vision of CRNs as cognitive networks, however, requires that the research focus progresses from its current system-level fixation to the a network-wide optimization focus. This motivates the development of cognitive routing protocols envisioned as routing protocols that fully and seamlessly incorporate artificial intelligence (AI)-based techniques into their design. In this paper, we provide a self-contained exposition of various decision-theoretic and learning techniques from the field of AI and machine-learning that are relevant to the problem of cognitive routing in CRNs. Apart from providing necessary background, we present for each technique discussed in this paper their application in the context of CRNs in general and for the routing problem in particular. We also highlight challenges associated with these techniques and common pitfalls. Finally, open research issues and future directions of work are identified.

    This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.


    How I Keras on C ++ started

    Not long ago, I was faced with a production task — to launch the trained Kesas neural network Kesas in native C++ code. Oddly enough, the decision was not at all trivial. As a result, there appeared its own library, which gives such an opportunity. How is it - neural networks on clean crosses and there will be a small article today.

    Those who can not wait - here is the repository on github, with a detailed description of the use. Well, and all the rest I ask under the cat .

    Formulation of the problem.

    In the process, I needed to run a trained model in a C++ application (Unreal Engune 4) . But bad luck: today there is almost no way to run the Keras model in C ++.

    The option of calling Python from C++ did not seem good to me. Another option was to convert the Keras model to the TensorFlow model and then build the TensoFflow under the crosses and call the API TF from C ++ code.

    This process of metamorphosis is well described in this article . But with this also difficulties arise. First , TensorFlow is going through Bzzel . And the bezel itself is capricious and refused to assemble under UE4 . Secondly , the TF itself is quite a big and cumbersome thing, but I wanted something lighter and more productive. I can only say that in the github open spaces a semi-working project was found, with the functionality I needed. But, he did not support current versions of Python and Keras . And the attempts to remake it were not crowned with success: The C ++ application failed with the Core Dump error . It was decided to write their own implementation .

    We write our library!

    Turning the rock heavier, throwing a bottle pivasa energy, I sat behind the code. In many ways, the TensorFlow code, attempts to rehabilitate the code found on гит , some knowledge about algorithms and data structures (thanks to ITMO for its courses) and good ear music helped me in implementing this library. Anyway, the library was written overnight.

    And so meet: Keras2cpp!

    The first part of the library is the Python module for saving the trained model in its own binary format.

    There is nothing difficult in this operation. We simply read the Keras model and write bitwise to the file: first тип слоя , then the размерность , then матрицу весов in the float format.

    We now turn to the most delicious - C ++ implementation.

    Two tensor and model entities are available to the user.

    Tensor - transfers the data with which the neural network works and is a computer implementation of the tensor. Currently, the maximum dimension in 4 dimensions is supported. The dimension of each dimension is stored in the std::vector<int> dims_ and the weight of each tensor element is in std::vector<int> data_ . From the available methods you can select void Print() and Tensor Select(int row) . The rest of the operations you can see in the source code. After the math for tensors was written, I started to implement the models.

    Model - is a set of layers in each of which operations on tensors and weights matrix are registered. Two functions are available for the user. virtual bool LoadModel(const std::string& filename) and virtual bool Apply(Tensor* in, Tensor* out) .

    Here is a complete code example.

    On this I think everything. Enjoyable use, and I will go to my favorite C # and Python to write neural networks further.

    I liked writing this library. When you write everything yourself from scratch, you understand more, but how it works . Plans to add support for other architectures and GPUs .


    Abstract

    A technique for baseflow separation is presented based on similarity solutions of the Boussinesq equation . The method makes use of the simplifying assumptions that a horizontal impermeable layer underlies a Dupuit aquifer which is drained by a fully penetratin.

    Discusses when the writing of chemical formula and equations can be introduced in the school science curriculum. Also presents ways in which formulae and equations learning can be aided and some examples for balancing and interpreting equations . (HM)

    Sánchez Pérez, J F Conesa, M Alhama, I Alhama, F Cánovas, M

    Classical dimensional analysis and nondimensionalization are assumed to be two similar approaches in the search for dimensionless groups. Both techniques, simplify the study of many problems. The first approach does not need to know the mathematical model, being sufficient a deep understanding of the physical phenomenon involved, while the second one begins with the governing equations and reduces them to their dimensionless form by simple mathematical manipulations. In this work, a formal protocol is proposed for applying the nondimensionalization process to ordinary differential equations , linear or not, leading to dimensionless normalized equations from which the resulting dimensionless groups have two inherent properties: In one hand, they are physically interpreted as balances between counteracting quantities in the problem, and on the other hand, they are of the order of magnitude unity. The solutions provided by nondimensionalization are more precise in every case than those from dimensional analysis, as it is illustrated by the applications studied in this work.

    Donati, Fabrizio Figueroa, C. Alberto Smith, Nicolas P. Lamata, Pablo Nordsletten, David A.

    Pressure difference is an accepted clinical biomarker for cardiovascular disease conditions such as aortic coarctation. Currently, measurements of pressure differences in the clinic rely on invasive techniques (catheterization), prompting development of non-invasive estimates based on blood flow. In this work, we propose a non-invasive estimation procedure deriving pressure difference from the work-energy equation for a Newtonian fluid. Spatial and temporal convergence is demonstrated on in silico Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Image (PC-MRI) phantoms with steady and transient flow fields. The method is also tested on an image dataset generated in silico from a 3D patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation and finally evaluated on a cohort of 9 subjects. The performance is compared to existing approaches based on steady and unsteady Bernoulli formulations as well as the pressure Poisson equation . The new technique shows good accuracy, robustness to noise, and robustness to the image segmentation process, illustrating the potential of this approach for non-invasive pressure difference estimation. PMID:26409245

    Gómez-Aguilar, J. F. Escobar-Jiménez, R. F. Olivares-Peregrino, V. H. Benavides-Cruz, M. Calderón-Ramón, C.

    In this paper, we present an analysis and modeling of the electrical diffusion equation using the fractional calculus approach. This alternative representation for the current density is expressed in terms of the Caputo derivatives, the order for the space domain is 0 equation involving space and time fractional derivatives using numerical methods based on Fourier variable separation. The case with spatial fractional derivatives leads to Levy flight type phenomena, while the time fractional equation is related to sub- or super diffusion. We show that the mathematical concept of fractional derivatives can be useful to understand the behavior of semiconductors, the design of solar panels, electrochemical phenomena and the description of anomalous complex processes.

    Schmitz, Guy Kolar-Anić, Ljiljana Z Anić, Slobodan R Cupić, Zeljko D

    The stoichiometric network analysis (SNA) introduced by B. L. Clarke is applied to a simplified model of the complex oscillating Bray-Liebhafsky reaction under batch conditions, which was not examined by this method earlier. This powerful method for the analysis of steady-states stability is also used to transform the classical differential equations into dimensionless equations . This transformation is easy and leads to a form of the equations combining the advantages of classical dimensionless equations with the advantages of the SNA. The used dimensionless parameters have orders of magnitude given by the experimental information about concentrations and currents. This simplifies greatly the study of the slow manifold and shows which parameters are essential for controlling its shape and consequently have an important influence on the trajectories. The effectiveness of these equations is illustrated on two examples: the study of the bifurcations points and a simple sensitivity analysis, different from the classical one, more based on the chemistry of the studied system.

    Biagetti, Matteo Desjacques, Vincent Kehagias, Alex

    Dark matter halos are the building blocks of the universe as they host galaxies and clusters. The knowledge of the clustering properties of halos is therefore essential for the understanding of the galaxy statistical properties. We derive an effective halo Boltzmann equation which can be used to describe the halo clustering statistics. In particular, we show how the halo Boltzmann equation encodes a statistically biased gravitational force which generates a bias in the peculiar velocities of virialized halos with respect to the underlying dark matter, as recently observed in N-body simulations.

    This book provides a unified treatment of both regular (or random) and Ito stochastic differential equations . It focuses on solution methods, including some developed only recently. Applications are discussed, in particular an insight is given into both the mathematical structure, and the most efficient solution methods (analytical as well as numerical). Starting from basic notions and results of the theory of stochastic processes and stochastic calculus (including Ito's stochastic integral), many principal mathematical problems and results related to stochastic differential equations are expounded here for the first time. Applications treated include those relating to road vehicles, earthquake excitations and offshoremore » structures.« less

    The kernel method of test equating is a unified approach to test equating with some advantages over traditional equating methods. Therefore, it is important to evaluate in a comprehensive way the usefulness and appropriateness of the Kernel equating (KE) method, as well as its advantages and disadvantages compared with several popular item…

    We provide the statistical generalization of the Drake equation . From a simple product of seven positive numbers, the Drake equation is now turned into the product of seven positive random variables. We call this "the Statistical Drake Equation ". The mathematical consequences of this transformation are then derived. The proof of our results is based on the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) of Statistics. In loose terms, the CLT states that the sum of any number of independent random variables, each of which may be ARBITRARILY distributed, approaches a Gaussian (i.e. normal) random variable. This is called the Lyapunov Form of the CLT, or the Lindeberg Form of the CLT, depending on the mathematical constraints assumed on the third moments of the various probability distributions. In conclusion, we show that: The new random variable N, yielding the number of communicating civilizations in the Galaxy, follows the LOGNORMAL distribution. Then, as a consequence, the mean value of this lognormal distribution is the ordinary N in the Drake equation . The standard deviation, mode, and all the moments of this lognormal N are also found. The seven factors in the ordinary Drake equation now become seven positive random variables. The probability distribution of each random variable may be ARBITRARY. The CLT in the so-called Lyapunov or Lindeberg forms (that both do not assume the factors to be identically distributed) allows for that. In other words, the CLT "translates" into our statistical Drake equation by allowing an arbitrary probability distribution for each factor. This is both physically realistic and practically very useful, of course. An application of our statistical Drake equation then follows. The (average) DISTANCE between any two neighboring and communicating civilizations in the Galaxy may be shown to be inversely proportional to the cubic root of N. Then, in our approach, this distance becomes a new random variable. We derive the relevant probability density

    We recently formulated a model of the universe based on an underlying W3-symmetry. It allows the creation of the universe from nothing and the creation of baby universes and wormholes for spacetimes of dimension 2, 3, 4, 6 and 10. Here we show that the classical large time and large space limit of these universes is one of exponential fast expansion without the need of a cosmological constant. Under a number of simplifying assumptions, our model predicts that w = ‑1.2 in the case of four-dimensional spacetime. The possibility of obtaining a w-value less than ‑1 is linked to the ability of our model to create baby universes and wormholes.

    Mishra, Srikanta Ganesh, Priya Schuetter, Jared

    CO2 sequestration in deep saline formations is increasingly being considered as a viable strategy for the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources. In this context, detailed numerical simulation based models are routinely used to understand key processes and parameters affecting pressure propagation and buoyant plume migration following CO2 injection into the subsurface. As these models are data and computation intensive, the development of computationally-efficient alternatives to conventional numerical simulators has become an active area of research. Such simplified models can be valuable assets during preliminary CO2 injection project screening, serve as a key element of probabilistic system assessmentmore » modeling tools, and assist regulators in quickly evaluating geological storage projects. We present three strategies for the development and validation of simplified modeling approaches for CO2 sequestration in deep saline formations: (1) simplified physics-based modeling, (2) statisticallearning based modeling, and (3) reduced-order method based modeling. In the first category, a set of full-physics compositional simulations is used to develop correlations for dimensionless injectivity as a function of the slope of the CO2 fractional-flow curve, variance of layer permeability values, and the nature of vertical permeability arrangement. The same variables, along with a modified gravity number, can be used to develop a correlation for the total storage efficiency within the CO2 plume footprint. Furthermore, the dimensionless average pressure buildup after the onset of boundary effects can be correlated to dimensionless time, CO2 plume footprint, and storativity contrast between the reservoir and caprock. In the second category, statistical “proxy models” are developed using the simulation domain described previously with two approaches: (a) classical Box-Behnken experimental design with a quadratic response surface, and (b

    Fang, Cheng Butler, David Lee

    In this paper, an innovative method for CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine) self-calibration is proposed. In contrast to conventional CMM calibration that relies heavily on a high precision reference standard such as a laser interferometer, the proposed calibration method is based on a low-cost artefact which is fabricated with commercially available precision ball bearings. By optimizing the mathematical model and rearranging the data sampling positions, the experimental process and data analysis can be simplified . In mathematical expression, the samples can be minimized by eliminating the redundant equations among those configured by the experimental data array. The section lengths of the artefact are measured at arranged positions, with which an equation set can be configured to determine the measurement errors at the corresponding positions. With the proposed method, the equation set is short of one equation , which can be supplemented by either measuring the total length of the artefact with a higher-precision CMM or calibrating the single point error at the extreme position with a laser interferometer. In this paper, the latter is selected. With spline interpolation, the error compensation curve can be determined. To verify the proposed method, a simple calibration system was set up on a commercial CMM. Experimental results showed that with the error compensation curve uncertainty of the measurement can be reduced to 50%.

    Lin, Ching-Hung Lin, Yu-Kai Song, Tzu-Jiun Huang, Jong-Tsun Chiu, Yao-Chu

    The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) has been standardized as a clinical assessment tool (Bechara, 2007). Nonetheless, numerous research groups have attempted to modify IGT models to optimize parameters for predicting the choice behavior of normal controls and patients. A decade ago, most researchers considered the expected utility (EU) model (Busemeyer and Stout, 2002) to be the optimal model for predicting choice behavior under uncertainty. However, in recent years, studies have demonstrated that models with the prospect utility (PU) function are more effective than the EU models in the IGT (Ahn et al., 2008). Nevertheless, after some preliminary tests based on our behavioral dataset and modeling, it was determined that the Ahn et al. (2008) PU model is not optimal due to some incompatible results. This study aims to modify the Ahn et al. (2008) PU model to a simplified model and used the IGT performance of 145 subjects as the benchmark data for comparison. In our simplified PU model, the best goodness-of-fit was found mostly as the value of α approached zero. More specifically, we retested the key parameters α, λ, and A in the PU model. Notably, the influence of the parameters α, λ, and A has a hierarchical power structure in terms of manipulating the goodness-of-fit in the PU model. Additionally, we found that the parameters λ and A may be ineffective when the parameter α is close to zero in the PU model. The present simplified model demonstrated that decision makers mostly adopted the strategy of gain-stay loss-shift rather than foreseeing the long-term outcome. However, there are other behavioral variables that are not well revealed under these dynamic-uncertainty situations. Therefore, the optimal behavioral models may not have been found yet. In short, the best model for predicting choice behavior under dynamic-uncertainty situations should be further evaluated. PMID:27582715

    Lessler, Justin Kaufman, James H Ford, Daniel A Douglas, Judith V

    Air travel plays a key role in the spread of many pathogens. Modeling the long distance spread of infectious disease in these cases requires an air travel model. Highly detailed air transportation models can be over determined and computationally problematic. We compared the predictions of a simplified air transport model with those of a model of all routes and assessed the impact of differences on models of infectious disease. Using U.S. ticket data from 2007, we compared a simplified "pipe" model, in which individuals flow in and out of the air transport system based on the number of arrivals and departures from a given airport, to a fully saturated model where all routes are modeled individually. We also compared the pipe model to a "gravity" model where the probability of travel is scaled by physical distance the gravity model did not differ significantly from the pipe model. The pipe model roughly approximated actual air travel, but tended to overestimate the number of trips between small airports and underestimate travel between major east and west coast airports. For most routes, the maximum number of false (or missed) introductions of disease is small ( simplified pipe model may be adequate. If we are interested in specific effects of interventions on particular air routes or the time for the disease to reach a particular location, a more complex point-to-point model will be more accurate. For many problems a hybrid model that independently models some frequently traveled routes may be the best choice. Regardless of the model used, the effect of simplifications and sensitivity to errors in parameter estimation should be analyzed.

    Describes a study of students' ability to balance equations . Answers to a test on this topic were analyzed to determine the level of understanding and processes used by the students. Presented is a method to teach this skill to high school chemistry students. (CW)

    Equations for deformation and stress, which are the basis for tension members and beam and column design, are discussed in this chapter. The first two sections cover tapered members, straight members, and special considerations such as notches, slits, and size effect. A third section presents stability criteria for members subject to buckling and for members subject to.

    Chaachoua, Hamid Saglam, Ayse

    This paper aims to show the close relation between physics and mathematics taking into account especially the theory of differential equations . By analysing the problems posed by scientists in the seventeenth century, we note that physics is very important for the emergence of this theory. Taking into account this analysis, we show the…

    Brandmaier, Andreas M. von Oertzen, Timo McArdle, John J. Lindenberger, Ulman

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree…

    Equations for deformation and stress, which are the basis for tension members and beam and column design, are discussed in this chapter. The first two sections cover tapered members, straight members, and special considerations such as notches, slits, and size effect. A third section presents stability criteria for members subject to buckling and for members subject to.

    Through numerical investigations, we study examples of the forced quadratic spring equation [image omitted]. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, we demonstrate the existence of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions, investigate the resonance boundary in the [omega]…

    . 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Alternative simplified credit (temporary). 1.41. INCOME TAXES Credits Against Tax § 1.41-9T Alternative simplified credit (temporary). (a) Determination. provisions of the alternative simplified credit (ASC) in section 41(c)(5) for any taxable year of the.

    . ) SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE COMPLAINT AND INVESTIGATION. the simplified standards: (1) In cases relying upon the Simplified -SAC methodology: Day 0—Complaint. dominance. (b) Defendant's second disclosure. In cases using the Simplified -SAC methodology, the defendant.

    . acquisition procedures financing. 1552.232-74 Section 1552.232-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System. Provisions and Clauses 1552.232-74 Payments— simplified acquisition procedures financing. As prescribed in. acquisition procedures financing. Payments— Simplified Acquisition Procedures Financing (JUN 2006) Simplified .

    . -AH29 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Simplified Acquisition Threshold for. statutory authority to invoke a simplified acquisition threshold that is two times the normal amount to. ) to invoke a simplified acquisition threshold that is two times the amount specified at 41 U.S.C 134.

    Quantitative analytical procedures for relating selected water quality parameters to the characteristics of the backscattered signals, measured by remote sensors, require the solution of the radiative transport equation in turbid media. Presented is an approximate closed form solution of this equation and based on this solution, the remote sensing of sediments is discussed. The results are compared with other standard closed form solutions such as quasi-single scattering approximations.

    Rohn, D. A. Loewenthal, S. H. Coy, J. J.

    A simplified fatigue life analysis for traction drive contacts of arbitrary geometry is presented. The analysis is based on the Lundberg-Palmgren theory used for rolling-element bearings. The effects of torque, element size, speed, contact ellipse ratio, and the influence of traction coefficient are shown. The analysis shows that within the limits of the available traction coefficient, traction contacts exhibit longest life at high speeds. Multiple, load-sharing roller arrangements have an advantageous effect on system life, torque capacity, power-to-weight ratio and size.

    A simplified aerodynamic theory of the cyclogiro rotating wing is presented herein. In addition, examples have been calculated showing the effect on the rotor characteristics of varying the design parameters of the rotor. A performance prediction, on the basis of the theory here developed, is appended, showing the performance to be expected of a machine employing this system of sustentation. The aerodynamic principles of the cyclogiro are sound hovering flight, vertical climb, and a reasonable forward speed may be obtained with a normal expenditure of power. Auto rotation in a gliding descent is available in the event of a power-plant failure.

    Reed, Irving S. Shih, Ming-Tang Truong, T. K. Hendon, E. Tufts, D. W.

    The arithmetic Fourier transform (AFT) is a number-theoretic approach to Fourier analysis which has been shown to perform competitively with the classical FFT in terms of accuracy, complexity, and speed. Theorems developed in a previous paper for the AFT algorithm are used here to derive the original AFT algorithm which Bruns found in 1903. This is shown to yield an algorithm of less complexity and of improved performance over certain recent AFT algorithms. A VLSI architecture is suggested for this simplified AFT algorithm. This architecture uses a butterfly structure which reduces the number of additions by 25 percent of that used in the direct method.

    Pigati, J.S. Lifton, N.A. Timothy, Jull A.J. Quade, Jay

    Using an atomic model with a simplified sequence-based potential, the folding properties of several different peptides are studied. Both α-helical (Trp cage, Fs) and β-sheet (GB1p, GB1m2, GB1m3, Betanova, LLM) peptides are considered. The model is able to fold these different peptides for one and the same choice of parameters, and the melting behaviour of the peptides (folded population against temperature) is in very good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, using the same model with unchanged parameters, the aggregation behaviour of a fibril-forming fragment of the Alzheimer's A β peptide is studied, with very promising results.

    Kozlowski, C.P. Bauman, J.E. Hahn, D.C.

    Female birds deposit significant amounts of steroid hormones into the yolks of their eggs. Studies have demonstrated that these hormones, particularly androgens, affect nestling growth and development. In order to measure androgen concentrations in avian egg yolks, most authors follow the extraction methods outlined by Schwabl (1993. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 90:11446-11450). We describe a simplified method for extracting androgens from avian egg yolks. Our method, which has been validated through recovery and linearity experiments, consists of a single ethanol precipitation that produces substantially higher recoveries than those reported by Schwabl.

    The Spencer-Lewis equation , which describes electron transport in homogeneous media when continuous slowing down theory is valid, is derived from the Boltzmann equation . Also derived is a time-dependent generalized Spencer-Lewis equation valid for inhomogeneous media. An independent verification of this last equation is obtained for the one-dimensional case using particle balance considerations.

    I propose a unified framework for a joint analysis of the Drake equation and the Fermi paradox, which enables a simultaneous, quantitative study of both of them. The analysis is based on a simplified form of the Drake equation and on a fairly simple scheme for the colonization of the Milky Way. It appears that for sufficiently long-lived civilizations, colonization of the Galaxy is the only reasonable option to gain knowledge about other life forms. This argument allows one to define a region in the parameter space of the Drake equation , where the Fermi paradox definitely holds (`Strong Fermi paradox').

    Ellerbrock, Herman H. Wcislo, Chester R. Dexter, Howard E.

    Investigations were made to develop a simplified method for designing exhaust-pipe shrouds to provide desired or maximum cooling of exhaust installations. Analysis of heat exchange and pressure drop of an adequate exhaust-pipe shroud system requires equations for predicting design temperatures and pressure drop on cooling air side of system. Present experiments derive such equations for usual straight annular exhaust-pipe shroud systems for both parallel flow and counter flow. Equations and methods presented are believed to be applicable under certain conditions to the design of shrouds for tail pipes of jet engines.

    Sarovar, Mohan Grace, Matthew D

    The expansion of a stochastic Liouville equation for the coupled evolution of a quantum system and an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process into a hierarchy of coupled differential equations is a useful technique that simplifies the simulation of stochastically driven quantum systems. We expand the applicability of this technique by completely characterizing the class of diffusive Markov processes for which a useful hierarchy of equations can be derived. The expansion of this technique enables the examination of quantum systems driven by non-Gaussian stochastic processes with bounded range. We present an application of this extended technique by simulating Stark-tuned Förster resonance transfer in Rydberg atoms with nonperturbative position fluctuations.

    The equations of motion for the remote manipulator system, assuming that the masses and inertias of the arm can be neglected, are developed for implementation into the space vehicle dynamics simulation (SVDS) program for the Orbiter payload system. The arm flexibility is incorporated into the equations by the computation of flexibility terms for use in the joint servo model. The approach developed in this report is based on using the Jacobian transformation matrix to transform force and velocity terms between the configuration space and the task space to simplify the form of the equations .

    1983) compared conventional and IRT methods for equating the Test of English as a Foreign Language ( TOEFL ) after chaining. Three conventional and. three IRT equating methods were examined in this study two sections of TOEFL were each (separately) equated . The IRT methods included the following: (a. group. A separate base form was established for each of the six equating methods. Instead of equating the base-form TOEFL to itself, the last (eighth

    Two apparently disparate lines of inquiry in kinetic theory are shown to be equivalent: (1) Brownian motion as treated by the (stochastic) Langevin equation and Fokker-Planck equation and (2) Boltzmann's equation . The method is to derive the kinetic equation for Brownian motion from the Boltzmann equation for a two-component neutral gas by a simultaneous expansion in the density and mass ratios.

    Grubmüller, Helmut Tavan, Paul

    Extended molecular dynamics simulations covering a total of 0.232 μs have been carried out on a simplified protein model. Despite its simplified structure, that model exhibits properties similar to those of more realistic protein models. In particular, the model was found to undergo transitions between conformational substates at a time scale of several hundred picoseconds. The computed trajectories turned out to be sufficiently long as to permit a statistical analysis of that conformational dynamics. To check whether effective descriptions neglecting memory effects can reproduce the observed conformational dynamics, two stochastic models were studied. A one-dimensional Langevin effective potential model derived by elimination of subpicosecond dynamical processes could not describe the observed conformational transition rates. In contrast, a simple Markov model describing the transitions between but neglecting dynamical processes within conformational substates reproduced the observed distribution of first passage times. These findings suggest, that protein dynamics generally does not exhibit memory effects at time scales above a few hundred picoseconds, but confirms the existence of memory effects at a picosecond time scale.

    Mishra, Srikanta Ganesh, Priya

    We present a simplified -physics based approach, where only the most important physical processes are modeled, to develop and validate simplified predictive models of CO2 sequestration in deep saline formation. The system of interest is a single vertical well injecting supercritical CO2 into a 2-D layered reservoir-caprock system with variable layer permeabilities. We use a set of well-designed full-physics compositional simulations to understand key processes and parameters affecting pressure propagation and buoyant plume migration. Based on these simulations, we have developed correlations for dimensionless injectivity as a function of the slope of fractional-flow curve, variance of layer permeability values, and themore » nature of vertical permeability arrangement. The same variables, along with a modified gravity number, can be used to develop a correlation for the total storage efficiency within the CO2 plume footprint. Similar correlations are also developed to predict the average pressure within the injection reservoir, and the pressure buildup within the caprock.« less

    Fuks, Benjamin Klasen, Michael Schmiemann, Saskia Sunder, Marthijn

    We present simplified MSSM models for light neutralinos and charginos with realistic mass spectra and realistic gaugino-higgsino mixing, that can be used in experimental searches at the LHC. The formerly used naive approach of defining mass spectra and mixing matrix elements manually and independently of each other does not yield genuine MSSM benchmarks. We suggest the use of less simplified , but realistic MSSM models, whose mass spectra and mixing matrix elements are the result of a proper matrix diagonalisation. We propose a novel strategy targeting the design of such benchmark scenarios, accounting for user-defined constraints in terms of masses and particle mixing. We apply it to the higgsino case and implement a scan in the four relevant underlying parameters <μ ,="" tan="" β="" ,="" m1,="" m2="">for a given set of light neutralino and chargino masses. We define a measure for the quality of the obtained benchmarks, that also includes criteria to assess the higgsino content of the resulting charginos and neutralinos. We finally discuss the distribution of the resulting models in the MSSM parameter space as well as their implications for supersymmetric dark matter phenomenology.

    Uchimura, Keiichi Kawano, Masato Tokitsu, Hiroki Hu, Zhencheng

    In recent years, digital maps have been used in a variety of scenarios, including car navigation systems and map information services over the Internet. These digital maps are formed by multiple layers of maps of different scales the map data most suitable for the specific situation are used. Currently, the production of map data of different scales is done by hand due to constraints related to processing time and accuracy. We conducted research concerning technologies for automatic generation of simplified map data from detailed map data. In the present paper, the authors propose the following: (1) a method to transform data related to streets, rivers, etc. containing widths into line data, (2) a method to eliminate the component points of the data, and (3) a method to eliminate data that lie below a certain threshold. In addition, in order to evaluate the proposed method, a user survey was conducted in this survey we compared maps generated using the proposed method with the commercially available maps. From the viewpoint of the amount of data reduction and processing time, and on the basis of the results of the survey, we confirmed the effectiveness of the automatic generation of simplified maps using the proposed methods.

    The Metadata Management Tool (MMT) is the newest capability developed as part of NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System's (EOSDIS) efforts to simplify metadata creation and improve metadata quality. The MMT was developed via an agile methodology, taking into account inputs from GCMD's science coordinators and other end-users. In its initial release, the MMT uses the Unified Metadata Model for Collections (UMM-C) to allow metadata providers to easily create and update collection records in the ISO-19115 format. Through a simplified UI experience, metadata curators can create and edit collections without full knowledge of the NASA Best Practices implementation of ISO-19115 format, while still generating compliant metadata. More experienced users are also able to access raw metadata to build more complex records as needed. In future releases, the MMT will build upon recent work done in the community to assess metadata quality and compliance with a variety of standards through application of metadata rubrics. The tool will provide users with clear guidance as to how to easily change their metadata in order to improve their quality and compliance. Through these features, the MMT allows data providers to create and maintain compliant and high quality metadata in a short amount of time.

    Annus, P. Land, R. Reidla, M. Ojarand, J. Mughal, Y. Min, M.

    Classical method for measurement of the electrical bio-impedance involves excitation with sinusoidal waveform. Sinusoidal excitation at fixed frequency points enables wide variety of signal processing options, most general of them being Fourier transform. Multiplication with two quadrature waveforms at desired frequency could be easily accomplished both in analogue and in digital domains, even simplest quadrature square waves can be considered, which reduces signal processing task in analogue domain to synchronous switching followed by low pass filter, and in digital domain requires only additions. So called spectrally sparse excitation sequences (SSS), which have been recently introduced into bio-impedance measurement domain, are very reasonable choice when simultaneous multifrequency excitation is required. They have many good properties, such as ease of generation and good crest factor compared to similar multisinusoids. Typically, the usage of discrete or fast Fourier transform in signal processing step is considered so far. Usage of simplified methods nevertheless would reduce computational burden, and enable simpler, less costly and less energy hungry signal processing platforms. Accuracy of the measurement with SSS excitation when using different waveforms for quadrature demodulation will be compared in order to evaluate the feasibility of the simplified signal processing. Sigma delta modulated sinusoid (binary signal) is considered to be a good alternative for a synchronous demodulation.

    Xu, Kesheng Zhang, Xiyun Wang, Chaoqing Liu, Zonghua

    Many experiments have evidenced the transition with different time scales from short-term memory (STM) to long-term memory (LTM) in mammalian brains, while its theoretical understanding is still under debate. To understand its underlying mechanism, it has recently been shown that it is possible to have a long-period rhythmic synchronous firing in a scale-free network, provided the existence of both the high-degree hubs and the loops formed by low-degree nodes. We here present a simplified memory network model to show that the self-sustained synchronous firing can be observed even without these two necessary conditions. This simplified network consists of two loops of coupled excitable neurons with different synaptic conductance and with one node being the sensory neuron to receive an external stimulus signal. This model can be further used to show how the diversity of firing patterns can be selectively formed by varying the signal frequency, duration of the stimulus and network topology, which corresponds to the patterns of STM and LTM with different time scales. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain the underlying mechanism of firing patterns.

    Zimmerman, Deborah L Swedko, Peter J Posen, Gerald A Burns, Kevin D

    Observational studies of daily hemodialysis (HD) and intermittent hemofiltration (HF) therapy have been associated with improved outcomes for patients with endstage renal disease. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the feasibility of daily HF as an alternative to intermittent HD using a simplified HF system (NxStage Medical). Each patient received 1 week of intermittent HD followed by 4 weeks of daily HF. Ringers lactate was used as the initial replacement solution however, Hemosol LG2/L0 was used subsequently to simplify patient management. Changes in quality of life, nutrition, and laboratory values were assessed. Seven patients have completed 168 HF treatments with Hemosol. Their treatment time on HD was 232 minutes 3 days per week, and 132 minutes on HF 6 days per week. Single pool Kt/V per treatment for HD was 1.69 compared with 0.44 for HF (standard Kt/V 2.38 vs 1.93). Despite these weekly differences in urea clearance, potassium, calcium, phosphate, and nutrition remained stable. Beta-2 microglobulin tended to decline. All parameters of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Instrument Short Form (KDQOL-SF) either remained stable or improved. In addition, blood pressure declined, allowing for a reduction in the number of antihypertensive medications. In summary, these preliminary data suggest that daily HF with this system is safe, simple, efficacious, and could potentially be used as a home based renal replacement therapy.

    . for contracts not to exceed the simplified acquisition threshold. 836.602-5 Section 836.602-5 Federal. contracts not to exceed the simplified acquisition threshold. Either of the procedures provided in FAR 36. simplified acquisition threshold. .

    Solórzano, S. Mendoza, M. Succi, S. Herrmann, H. J.

    We present a numerical scheme to solve the Wigner equation , based on a lattice discretization of momentum space. The moments of the Wigner function are recovered exactly, up to the desired order given by the number of discrete momenta retained in the discretization, which also determines the accuracy of the method. The Wigner equation is equipped with an additional collision operator, designed in such a way as to ensure numerical stability without affecting the evolution of the relevant moments of the Wigner function. The lattice Wigner scheme is validated for the case of quantum harmonic and anharmonic potentials, showing good agreement with theoretical results. It is further applied to the study of the transport properties of one- and two-dimensional open quantum systems with potential barriers. Finally, the computational viability of the scheme for the case of three-dimensional open systems is also illustrated.

    Solórzano, S Mendoza, M Succi, S Herrmann, H J

    We present a numerical scheme to solve the Wigner equation , based on a lattice discretization of momentum space. The moments of the Wigner function are recovered exactly, up to the desired order given by the number of discrete momenta retained in the discretization, which also determines the accuracy of the method. The Wigner equation is equipped with an additional collision operator, designed in such a way as to ensure numerical stability without affecting the evolution of the relevant moments of the Wigner function. The lattice Wigner scheme is validated for the case of quantum harmonic and anharmonic potentials, showing good agreement with theoretical results. It is further applied to the study of the transport properties of one- and two-dimensional open quantum systems with potential barriers. Finally, the computational viability of the scheme for the case of three-dimensional open systems is also illustrated.

    Inc, Mustafa Aliyu, Aliyu Isa Yusuf, Abdullahi

    This paper studies the dynamics of solitons to the nonlinear Schrödinger’s equation (NLSE) with spatio-temporal dispersion (STD). The integration algorithm that is employed in this paper is the Riccati- Bernoulli sub-ODE method. This leads to dark and singular soliton solutions that are important in the field of optoelectronics and fiber optics. The soliton solutions appear with all necessary constraint conditions that are necessary for them to exist. There are four types of nonlinear media studied in this paper. They are Kerr law, power law, parabolic law and dual law. The conservation laws (Cls) for the Kerr law and parabolic law nonlinear media are constructed using the conservation theorem presented by Ibragimov.

    In the almost half century since the Drake Equation was first conceived, a number of profound discoveries have been made that require each of the seven variables of this equation to be reconsidered. The discovery of hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor, for example, as well as the ever-increasing extreme conditions in which life is found on Earth, suggest a much wider range of possible extraterrestrial habitats. The growing consensus that life originated very early in Earth's history also supports this suggestion. The discovery of exoplanets with a wide range of host star types, and attendant habitable zones, suggests that life may be possible in planetary systems with stars quite unlike our Sun. Stellar evolution also plays an important part in that habitable zones are mobile. The increasing brightness of our Sun over the next few billion years, will place the Earth well outside the present habitable zone, but will then encompass Mars, giving rise to the notion that some Drake Equation variables, such as the fraction of planets on which life emerges, may have multiple values.

    Hayashida, K. B. Robinson, J. H.

    This report compares seven double-plate penetration predictor equations for accuracy and effectiveness of a shield design. Three of the seven are the Johnson Space Center original, modified, and new Cour-Palais equations . The other four are the Nysmith, Lundeberg-Stern-Bristow, Burch, and Wilkinson equations . These equations , except the Wilkinson equation , were derived from test results, with the velocities ranging up to 8 km/sec. Spreadsheet software calculated the projectile diameters for various velocities for the different equations . The results were plotted on projectile diameter versus velocity graphs for the expected orbital debris impact velocities ranging from 2 to 15 km/sec. The new Cour-Palais double-plate penetration equation was compared to the modified Cour-Palais single-plate penetration equation . Then the predictions from each of the seven double-plate penetration equations were compared to each other for a chosen shield design. Finally, these results from the equations were compared with test results performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Because the different equations predict a wide range of projectile diameters at any given velocity, it is very difficult to choose the "right" prediction equation for shield configurations other than those exactly used in the equations ' development. Although developed for various materials, the penetration equations alone cannot be relied upon to accurately predict the effectiveness of a shield without using hypervelocity impact tests to verify the design.

    Giovenzana, Valentina Civelli, Raffaele Beghi, Roberto Oberti, Roberto Guidetti, Riccardo

    The aim of this work was to test a simplified optical prototype for a rapid estimation of the ripening parameters of white grape for Franciacorta wine directly in field. Spectral acquisition based on reflectance at four wavelengths (630, 690, 750 and 850 nm) was proposed. The integration of a simple processing algorithm in the microcontroller software would allow to visualize real time values of spectral reflectance. Non-destructive analyses were carried out on 95 grape bunches for a total of 475 berries. Samplings were performed weekly during the last ripening stages. Optical measurements were carried out both using the simplified system and a portable commercial vis/NIR spectrophotometer, as reference instrument for performance comparison. Chemometric analyses were performed in order to extract the maximum useful information from optical data. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed for a preliminary evaluation of the data. Correlations between the optical data matrix and ripening parameters (total soluble solids content, SSC titratable acidity, TA) were carried out using partial least square (PLS) regression for spectra and using multiple linear regression (MLR) for data from the simplified device. Classification analysis were also performed with the aim of discriminate ripe and unripe samples. PCA, MLR and classification analyses show the effectiveness of the simplified system in separating samples among different sampling dates and in discriminating ripe from unripe samples. Finally, simple equations for SSC and TA prediction were calculated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    Yuan, Shifei Jiang, Lei Yin, Chengliang Wu, Hongjie Zhang, Xi

    To guarantee the safety, high efficiency and long lifetime for lithium-ion battery, an advanced battery management system requires a physics-meaningful yet computationally efficient battery model. The pseudo-two dimensional (P2D) electrochemical model can provide physical information about the lithium concentration and potential distributions across the cell dimension. However, the extensive computation burden caused by the temporal and spatial discretization limits its real-time application. In this research, we propose a new simplified electrochemical model (SEM) by modifying the boundary conditions for electrolyte diffusion equations , which significantly facilitates the analytical solving process. Then to obtain a reduced order transfer function, the Padé approximation method is adopted to simplify the derived transcendental impedance solution. The proposed model with the reduced order transfer function can be briefly computable and preserve physical meanings through the presence of parameters such as the solid/electrolyte diffusion coefficients (Ds&De) and particle radius. The simulation illustrates that the proposed simplified model maintains high accuracy for electrolyte phase concentration (Ce) predictions, saying 0.8% and 0.24% modeling error respectively, when compared to the rigorous model under 1C-rate pulse charge/discharge and urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS) profiles. Meanwhile, this simplified model yields significantly reduced computational burden, which benefits its real-time application.

    Mishra, Srikanta RaviGanesh, Priya Schuetter, Jared Mooney, Douglas He, Jincong Durlofsky, Louis

    We present results from an ongoing research project that seeks to develop and validate a portfolio of simplified modeling approaches that will enable rapid feasibility and risk assessment for CO2 sequestration in deep saline formation. The overall research goal is to provide tools for predicting: (a) injection well and formation pressure buildup, and (b) lateral and vertical CO2 plume migration. Simplified modeling approaches that are being developed in this research fall under three categories: (1) Simplified physics-based modeling (SPM), where only the most relevant physical processes are modeled, (2) Statistical-learning based modeling (SLM), where the simulator is replaced with a "response surface", and (3) Reduced-order method based modeling (RMM), where mathematical approximations reduce the computational burden. The system of interest is a single vertical well injecting supercritical CO2 into a 2-D layered reservoir-caprock system with variable layer permeabilities. In the first category (SPM), we use a set of well-designed full-physics compositional simulations to understand key processes and parameters affecting pressure propagation and buoyant plume migration. Based on these simulations, we have developed correlations for dimensionless injectivity as a function of the slope of fractional-flow curve, variance of layer permeability values, and the nature of vertical permeability arrangement. The same variables, along with a modified gravity number, can be used to develop a correlation for the total storage efficiency within the CO2 plume footprint. In the second category (SLM), we develop statistical "proxy models" using the simulation domain described previously with two different approaches: (a) classical Box-Behnken experimental design with a quadratic response surface fit, and (b) maximin Latin Hypercube sampling (LHS) based design with a Kriging metamodel fit using a quadratic trend and Gaussian correlation structure. For roughly the same number of

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy Maleki, Lute Matsko, Andrey Strekalov, Dmitry Grudinin, Ivan

    A simplified method of generating a beam of light having a relatively high value of angular momentum (see figure) involves the use of a compact apparatus consisting mainly of a laser, a whispering- gallery-mode (WGM) resonator, and optical fibers. The method also can be used to generate a Bessel beam. ( Bessel beam denotes a member of a class of non-diffracting beams, so named because their amplitudes are proportional to Bessel functions of the radii from their central axes. High-order Bessel beams can have high values of angular momentum.) High-angular-momentum light beams are used in some applications in biology and nanotechnology, wherein they are known for their ability to apply torque to make microscopic objects rotate. High-angular-momentum light beams could also be used to increase bandwidths of fiber-optic communication systems. The present simplified method of generating a high-angular-momentum light beam was conceived as an alternative to prior such methods, which are complicated and require optical setups that include, variously, holograms, modulating Fabry-Perot cavities, or special microstructures. The present simplified method exploits a combination of the complex structure of the electromagnetic field inside a WGM resonator, total internal reflection in the WGM resonator, and the electromagnetic modes supported by an optical fiber. The optical fiber used to extract light from the WGM resonator is made of fused quartz. The output end of this fiber is polished flat and perpendicular to the fiber axis. The input end of this fiber is cut on a slant and placed very close to the WGM resonator at an appropriate position and orientation. To excite the resonant whispering- gallery modes, light is introduced into the WGM resonator via another optical fiber that is part of a pigtailed fiber-optic coupler. Light extracted from the WGM resonator is transformed into a high-angular- momentum beam inside the extraction optical fiber and this beam is emitted from the

    Snyder, John Steven Randolph, Thomas M. Hofer, Richard R. Goebel, Dan M.

    The successful implementation of ion thruster technology on the Deep Space 1 technology demonstration mission paved the way for its first use on the Dawn science mission, which launched in September 2007. Both Deep Space 1 and Dawn used a "bang-bang" xenon feed system which has proven to be highly successful. This type of feed system, however, is complex with many parts and requires a significant amount of engineering work for architecture changes. A simplified feed system, with fewer parts and less engineering work for architecture changes, is desirable to reduce the feed system cost to future missions. An attractive new path for ion thruster feed systems is based on new components developed by industry in support of commercial applications of electric propulsion systems. For example, since the launch of Deep Space 1 tens of mechanical xenon pressure regulators have successfully flown on commercial spacecraft using electric propulsion. In addition, active proportional flow controllers have flown on the Hall-thruster-equipped Tacsat-2, are flying on the ion thruster GOCE mission, and will fly next year on the Advanced EHF spacecraft. This present paper briefly reviews the Dawn xenon feed system and those implemented on other xenon electric propulsion flight missions. A simplified feed system architecture is presented that is based on assembling flight-qualified components in a manner that will reduce non-recurring engineering associated with propulsion system architecture changes, and is compared to the NASA Dawn standard. The simplified feed system includes, compared to Dawn, passive high-pressure regulation, a reduced part count, reduced complexity due to cross-strapping, and reduced non-recurring engineering work required for feed system changes. A demonstration feed system was assembled using flight-like components and used to operate a laboratory NSTAR-class ion engine. Feed system components integrated into a single-string architecture successfully operated

    Darve, Eric Solomon, Jose Kia, Amirali

    The Mori-Zwanzig formalism is an effective tool to derive differential equations describing the evolution of a small number of resolved variables. In this paper we present its application to the derivation of generalized Langevin equations and generalized non-Markovian Fokker-Planck equations . We show how long time scales rates and metastable basins can be extracted from these equations . Numerical algorithms are proposed to discretize these equations . An important aspect is the numerical solution of the orthogonal dynamics equation which is a partial differential equation in a high dimensional space. We propose efficient numerical methods to solve this orthogonal dynamics equation . In addition, we present a projection formalism of the Mori-Zwanzig type that is applicable to discrete maps. Numerical applications are presented from the field of Hamiltonian systems.

    Pocheketa, Oleksandr A Popovych, Roman O

    The solution of the problem on reduction operators and nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation is systematically treated and completed. A new proof of the theorem on the special "no-go" case of regular reduction operators is presented, and the representation of the coefficients of operators in terms of solutions of the initial equation is constructed for this case. All possible nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation to single ordinary differential equations are exhaustively described. Any Lie reduction of the Burgers equation proves to be equivalent via the Hopf-Cole transformation to a parameterized family of Lie reductions of the linear heat equation .

    Pocheketa, Oleksandr A. Popovych, Roman O.

    The solution of the problem on reduction operators and nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation is systematically treated and completed. A new proof of the theorem on the special “no-go” case of regular reduction operators is presented, and the representation of the coefficients of operators in terms of solutions of the initial equation is constructed for this case. All possible nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation to single ordinary differential equations are exhaustively described. Any Lie reduction of the Burgers equation proves to be equivalent via the Hopf–Cole transformation to a parameterized family of Lie reductions of the linear heat equation . PMID:23576819

    Wright, S.A. Anderson, C.R. Voichick, N.

    Glen Canyon Dam, located on the Colorado River in northern Arizona, has affected the physical, biological and cultural resources of the river downstream in Grand Canyon. One of the impacts to the downstream physical environment that has important implications for the aquatic ecosystem is the transformation of the thermal regime from highly variable seasonally to relatively constant year-round, owing to hypolimnetic releases from the upstream reservoir, Lake Powell. Because of the perceived impacts on the downstream aquatic ecosystem and native fish communities, the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program has considered modifications to flow releases and release temperatures designed to increase downstream temperatures. Here, we present a new model of monthly average water temperatures below Glen Canyon Dam designed for first-order, relatively simple evaluation of various alternative dam operations. The model is based on a simplified heat-exchange equation , and model parameters are estimated empirically. The model predicts monthly average temperatures at locations up to 421 km downstream from the dam with average absolute errors less than 0.58C for the dataset considered. The modelling approach used here may also prove useful for other systems, particularly below large dams where release temperatures are substantially out of equilibrium with meteorological conditions. We also present some examples of how the model can be used to evaluate scenarios for the operation of Glen Canyon Dam.

    Chambers, Robert S. Tandon, Rajan Stavig, Mark E.

    In this study, to analyze the stresses and strains generated during the solidification of glass-forming materials, stress and volume relaxation must be predicted accurately. Although the modeling attributes required to depict physical aging in organic glassy thermosets strongly resemble the structural relaxation in inorganic glasses, the historical modeling approaches have been distinctly different. To determine whether a common constitutive framework can be applied to both classes of materials, the nonlinear viscoelastic simplified potential energy clock (SPEC) model, developed originally for glassy thermosets, was calibrated for the Schott 8061 inorganic glass and used to analyze a number of tests. A practicalmore » methodology for material characterization and model calibration is discussed, and the structural relaxation mechanism is interpreted in the context of SPEC model constitutive equations . SPEC predictions compared to inorganic glass data collected from thermal strain measurements and creep tests demonstrate the ability to achieve engineering accuracy and make the SPEC model feasible for engineering applications involving a much broader class of glassy materials.« less

    A computer program called HOPI was developed to predict reorientation flow dynamics, wherein liquids move from one end of a closed, partially filled, rigid container to the other end under the influence of container acceleration. The program uses the simplified marker and cell numerical technique and, using explicit finite-differencing, solves the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible viscous fluid. The effects of turbulence are also simulated in the program. HOPI can consider curved as well as straight walled boundaries. Both free-surface and confined flows can be calculated. The program was used to simulate five liquid reorientation cases. Three of these cases simulated actual NASA LeRC drop tower test conditions while two cases simulated full-scale Centaur tank conditions. It was concluded that while HOPI can be used to analytically determine the fluid motion in a typical settling problem, there is a current need to optimize HOPI. This includes both reducing the computer usage time and also reducing the core storage required for a given size problem.

    Mozrzymas, Marek Studziński, Michał Horodecki, Michał

    Herein we continue the study of the representation theory of the algebra of permutation operators acting on the n -fold tensor product space, partially transposed on the last subsystem. We develop the concept of partially reduced irreducible representations, which allows us to significantly simplify previously proved theorems and, most importantly, derive new results for irreducible representations of the mentioned algebra. In our analysis we are able to reduce the complexity of the central expressions by getting rid of sums over all permutations from the symmetric group, obtaining equations which are much more handy in practical applications. We also find relatively simple matrix representations for the generators of the underlying algebra. The obtained simplifications and developments are applied to derive the characteristics of a deterministic port-based teleportation scheme written purely in terms of irreducible representations of the studied algebra. We solve an eigenproblem for the generators of the algebra, which is the first step towards a hybrid port-based teleportation scheme and gives us new proofs of the asymptotic behaviour of teleportation fidelity. We also show a connection between the density operator characterising port-based teleportation and a particular matrix composed of an irreducible representation of the symmetric group, which encodes properties of the investigated algebra.

    Gallana, L. Di Savino, S. De Santi, F. Iovieno, M. Tordella, D.

    We consider a simplified physics of the could interface where condensation, evaporation and radiation are neglected and momentum, thermal energy and water vapor transport is represented in terms of the Boussinesq model coupled to a passive scalar transport equation for the vapor. The interface is modeled as a layer separating two isotropic turbulent regions with different kinetic energy and vapor concentration. In particular, we focus on the small scale part of the inertial range of the atmospheric boundary layer as well as on the dissipative range of scales which are important to the micro-physics of warm clouds. We have numerically investigated stably stratified interfaces by locally perturbing at an initial instant the standard temperature lapse rate at the cloud interface and then observing the temporal evolution of the system. When the buoyancy term becomes of the same order of the inertial one, we observe a spatial redistribution of the kinetic energy which produce a concomitant pit of kinetic energy within the mixing layer. In this situation, the mixing layer contains two interfacial regions with opposite kinetic energy gradient, which in turn produces two intermittent sublayers in the velocity fluctuations field. This changes the structure of the field with respect to the corresponding non-stratified shearless mixing: the communication between the two turbulent region is weak, and the growth of the mixing layer stops. These results are discussed with respect to Large Eddy Simulations data for the Planetary Boundary Layers.

    Moloto, K. D. Engelbrecht, N. E. Burger, R. A.

    A simplified ab initio approach is followed to model cosmic-ray proton modulation, using a steady-state three-dimensional stochastic solver of the Parker transport equation that simulates some effects of time dependence. Standard diffusion coefficients based on Quasilinear Theory and Nonlinear Guiding Center Theory are employed. The spatial and temporal dependences of the various turbulence quantities required as inputs for the diffusion, as well as the turbulence-reduced drift coefficients, follow from parametric fits to results from a turbulence transport model as well as from spacecraft observations of these turbulence quantities. Effective values are used for the solar wind speed, magnetic field magnitude, and tilt angle in the modulation model to simulate temporal effects due to changes in the large-scale heliospheric plasma. The unusually high cosmic-ray intensities observed during the 2009 solar minimum follow naturally from the current model for most of the energies considered. This demonstrates that changes in turbulence contribute significantly to the high intensities during that solar minimum. We also discuss and illustrate how this model can be used to predict future cosmic-ray intensities, and comment on the reliability of such predictions.

    A scheme is presented, for the heating of clear and cloudy air by solar and infrared radiation transfer, designed for use in tropospheric general circulation models with coarse vertical resolution. A bulk transmission function is defined for the infrared transfer. The interpolation factors, required for computing the bulk transmission function, are parameterized as functions of such physical parameters as the thickness of the layer, the pressure, and the mixing ratio at a reference level. The computation procedure for solar radiation is significantly simplified by the introduction of two basic concepts. The first is that the solar radiation spectrum can be divided into a scattered part, for which Rayleigh scattering is significant but absorption by water vapor is negligible, and an absorbed part for which absorption by water vapor is significant but Rayleigh scattering is negligible. The second concept is that of an equivalent cloud water vapor amount which absorbs the same amount of radiation as the cloud.

    Xu, Weikai Wang, Lin Chi, Chong-Yung

    In this paper, a simplified Generalized Code-Shifted Differential Chaos Shift Keying (GCS-DCSK) whose transmitter never needs any delay circuits, is proposed. However, its performance is deteriorated because the orthogonality between substreams cannot be guaranteed. In order to optimize its performance, the system model of the proposed GCS-DCSK with power allocations on substreams is presented. An approximate bit error rate (BER) expression of the proposed model, which is a function of substreams’ power, is derived using Gaussian Approximation. Based on the BER expression, an optimal power allocation strategy between information substreams and reference substream is obtained. Simulation results show that the BER performance of the proposed GCS-DCSK with the optimal power allocation can be significantly improved when the number of substreams M is large.

    Henrichs, M Langner, J Uhl, M

    During the last decade, water sensitive urban design (WSUD) has become more and more accepted. However, there is not any simple tool or option available to evaluate the influence of these measures on the local water balance. To counteract the impact of new settlements, planners focus on mitigating increases in runoff through installation of infiltration systems. This leads to an increasing non-natural groundwater recharge and decreased evapotranspiration. Simple software tools which evaluate or simulate the effect of WSUD on the local water balance are still needed. The authors developed a tool named WABILA (Wasserbilanz) that could support planners for optimal WSUD. WABILA is an easy-to-use planning tool that is based on simplified regression functions for established measures and land covers. Results show that WSUD has to be site-specific, based on climate conditions and the natural water balance.


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